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Blogs and Comments

Footprint Identification Technology (FIT) - where traditional ecology meets technology

Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai

25th May, 2016

The inspiration for Footprint Identification Technology (FIT) sprang from an unexpected source - traditional ecological know how. Conservationists Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai explain how that happened more...

Tree reasons why ancient oaks survived the felling of ancient forests in Britain

Peter Fiennes

11th September, 2017

Britain has 2,000 ancient yew trees yet there are only about 100 left in mainland Europe. England is home to more than 100 great oaks - trees aged over 800 years - more than the entire region from Calais to Cadiz. Author PETER FIENNES reflects on why so many old British trees have been saved from the axe more...

Cumbria's Bovine TB problem - hidden for years but now in the news

Lesley Docksey

25th August, 2017

Slowly the incidence of bTB in Cumbria has increased without any real outcry from the agricultural lobby. Why then, at the beginning of this month (August), has all of this information suddenly become news asks LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

My coal childhood - lessons for Australia from Germany's mine pit lakes

Anica Niepraschk

2nd August, 2017

How do you solve the problem of ‘retired' mine pits aka huge abandoned holes in the ground? Turning them into lakes is a popular solution but maybe not the best one says ANICA NIEPRASCK who should know since she grew up in the Lausitz region of Germany in a community surrounded by these massive, dangerous and polluting land holes more...

Brexit and the corporate war on regulations designed to protect life itself

Professor John McMurtry

1st August, 2017

Brexit is part of a corporate campaign to remove, undermine and attack European Union regulations and increase the rate of growth and profit. But these very regulations are necessary for the protection of the environment - and life itself. PROFESSOR JOHN McMURTRY, author of The Cancer Stage of Capitalism: from Crisis to Cure, raises the alarm. more...

How environmentalists can regroup for the Trump era

Robert Percival

25th July, 2017

Environmental law professor, ROBERT PERCIVAL, who has worked for both the Federal Government and a leading green nonprofit group, says despite the Trump administration's assault on America's environment laws they will survive... and may even be stronger for the attack more...

The future is bright for green energy and business

Jason Smith

24th July, 2017

Theresa May's government may have come to a grinding halt on environmental regulation but businesses still have a responsibility - and with it huge opportunities - to go green, argues JASON SMITH more...

Introduction to Rewilding

Kara Moses

14th July, 2017

Everyone is talking about rewilding at the moment. The debate around it is shaking up the conservation sector and public interest in it is huge, with a growing movement of people advocating the restoration of our degraded ecosystems. But what does it really mean to rewild? And how would you go about doing it if you actually have some land? more...

Why environmental communications can't just talk about the environment

Natalie Bennett

14th July, 2017


There's no doubt that one of the losers in this year's UK election was the environment and that there's clearly been a failure not just in politics, which is failing in so many ways, but also in environmental communication - a failure to reach people's hearts and minds with the urgent need for change, writes NATALIE BENNETT
more...

G20 summit showed international climate action really is 'Trump- proof'

Katrin Riegger

12th July, 2017

The G19 pro-climate coalition which agreed both an energy and climate action plan and important steps to help reorient private capital flows and business strategies towards a new sustainable direction has been deemed a success by many environmentalists, writes KATRIN RIEGGER (who was present at the conference for the Ecologist). But others say these agreements still do not go far enough and want to see global leaders adopting even more ambitious strategies to cut emissions and achieve the agreed goals of the Paris Agreement more...

We need rights of nature legislation now to protect our home planet

Michelle Bender

7 July, 2017

We need a new paradigm for ocean governance focused on well-being and guided by principles of sustainability, ecosystem health, precaution and interconnectedness, argues MICHELLE BENDER of the US based Earth Law Centre. more...

UK Artists showcase the plight of the disappearing British bee

Gary Cook, Arts Editor

7th July, 2017

Ecologist Arts Editor, GARY COOK, visits a new exhibition showcasing the plight of the British bee - those species already sadly lost and those on the verge of extinction more...

Blogs

My coal childhood - lessons for Australia from Germany's mine pit lakes

Anica Niepraschk

2nd August, 2017

How do you solve the problem of ‘retired' mine pits aka huge abandoned holes in the ground? Turning them into lakes is a popular solution but maybe not the best one says ANICA NIEPRASCK who should know since she grew up in the Lausitz region of Germany in a community surrounded by these massive, dangerous and polluting land holes more...

Introduction to Rewilding

Kara Moses

14th July, 2017

Everyone is talking about rewilding at the moment. The debate around it is shaking up the conservation sector and public interest in it is huge, with a growing movement of people advocating the restoration of our degraded ecosystems. But what does it really mean to rewild? And how would you go about doing it if you actually have some land? more...

Comment

Tree reasons why ancient oaks survived the felling of ancient forests in Britain

Peter Fiennes

11th September, 2017

Britain has 2,000 ancient yew trees yet there are only about 100 left in mainland Europe. England is home to more than 100 great oaks - trees aged over 800 years - more than the entire region from Calais to Cadiz. Author PETER FIENNES reflects on why so many old British trees have been saved from the axe more...

Cumbria's Bovine TB problem - hidden for years but now in the news

Lesley Docksey

25th August, 2017

Slowly the incidence of bTB in Cumbria has increased without any real outcry from the agricultural lobby. Why then, at the beginning of this month (August), has all of this information suddenly become news asks LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Letters

Letter: water use need not stall desert solar power

Dr Gerry Wolff

25th August, 2010

CSP trough-based system Yes, pioneering concentrating solar power plants are thirsty facilities, but their water use requirements could be made dramatically less more...

Letter - Time to get serious with the EU Emission Trading Scheme

27th May, 2010

Mark Chadwick

Carbon dioxide emissions Mark Chadwick from Carbon Clear argues a full auctioning of ETS permits is needed if the trading scheme is to start working more...

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