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Blogs and Comments

To hit fossil fuel firms where it hurts, support divestment!

Franklin Ginn

20th October 2014

Are there more nasty surprises in store for fossil fuel investors? The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, 22nd June 2010. Photo: Oscar Garcia / via John Amos on Flickr. Fossil fuel companies are a risky investment thanks to the 2.8 trillion tonnes of 'unburnable' carbon in their reserves, writes Franklin Ginn. But there's an even stronger reason to support fossil fuel divestment: to erode their political power, which they use to block progress to a sustainable, low carbon future. more...

London's 'Tarpaulin Revolution' lives another day

Donnachadh McCarthy

20th October 2014

Occupy Democracy - the Day 2 kettle of the Head of Boris Johnson's Wardens, selecting who to get the police to arrest. Photo: Donnachadh McCarthy. Last night the police were in full force in London's Parliament Square, writes Donnachadh McCarthy - forcibly removing Occupy Democracy protestors and snatching sleeping bags, cardboard and tarpaulins as illegal 'sleeping equipment', apparently on direct orders from the Mayor, Boris Johnson. Yet the rally keeps on growing .... more...

Less freedom in Westminster's Parliament Square than in Hong Kong!!

Donnachadh McCarthy

19th October 2014

The Occupy Democracy rally in London's Parliament Square last night. Photo: Nina Tailor / @ninatailor2. Donnachadh McCarthy went to Parliament Square yesterday to address a peaceful rally about the failings of British democracy. The intimidatory, violent and inflammatory police reaction only confirmed everything he had to say - as did the dignified restraint of the Occupy Democracy protestors. more...

Climate 'uncertainty' is no excuse for climate inaction

Richard Pancost & Stephan Lewandowsky

18th October 2014

Science can’t tell us exactly when the rising oceans will swallow up the Maldives, but it can give us a good idea. Photo: Hiroyuki-H, CC BY-SA. Scientific uncertainties over future climate are widely used by 'sceptics' to justify a policy of no response, write Richard Pancost & Stephan Lewandowsky. But this reflects a deep misunderstanding: outcomes may end up much more severe than expected - and we should prepare for worst case scenarios. more...

Excluding Greens from TV debates would make a mockery of democracy

Josiah Mortimer

16th October 2014

If you don't recognise Natalie Bennett, the Green Party's leader, it may because she has to fight all the way for media exposure. But in spite of the difficulties, the Greens pushed the Lib Dems into fifth place in the Euro-elections. UK broadcasters decision to exclude the Greens from the 2015 General Election debates has triggered a storm of protest, writes Josiah Mortimer. The numbers all show that the Greens deserve to be heard, but it's about more than that - the British people deserve the chance to engage in a new, progressive politics for the 21st century. more...

Global fracking boom could mean 12% higher emissions

Erik Bichard

17th October 2014

Infrastructure for shale gas in Scio, Ohio, Photo: Bilfinger SE via Flickr. A full-scale rush for shale gas would increase emissions, writes Erik Bichard, giving the lie to politicians' claims that fracking is 'climate friendly'. A new study in Nature shows that abundant shale gas would cause CO2 emissions to rise by a median 4.5%. When 'fugitive' methane is included the figure rises to 9.5%. more...

Scotland: time for a National Food Service?

Pete Ritchie & Miriam Ross

15th October 2014

Who needs vegetables when there's deep-fried Mars Bars to eat? Photo: karendesuyo via Flickr. The Scottish diet is famous for being the worst in Europe, write Pete Ritchie and Miriam Ross. Yet the country has rich land and sea resources, and exports large quantities of high quality food. By treating food as a common good instead of leaving the market to provide, Scots can start to transform their food future. more...

Take bushmeat off the menu before humans are served another ebola

Robert Young

14th October 2014

What’s for dinner? Crocodile and antelope. CIFOR, CC BY-NC-ND. Ebola and many other diseases have their origin in wild animals, writes Robert Young. The biggest opportunities for infection arises when people hunt and eat diseased animals, exposing themselves to their viruses and bacteria. To keep 'other ebolas' at bay, we must put an end to the bushmeat trade. more...

Help us reach the TTIP tipping point!

Morten Thaysen

11th October 2014

Protestors against the TTIP in Smith Square, London, 12th July 2014. Photo: World Developement Movment via Flickr. The TTIP - a massive trade and investment deal under negotiation between the US and the EU - could be the end of democracy as we know it, writes Morton Thaysen, as corporate rights will supplant those of ciizens and elected governments. Join a global day of action today! more...

British Airways - stop selling trips to SeaWorld!

Kathleen Haase

13th October 2013

Impressive and exciting, for sure. But what kind of life is it for an orca? Photo: Orca and trainer at SeaWorld in Orlando, Florida by Jeff Kraus via Flickr. British Airways' commercial partnership with SeaWorld condones the physical and psychological suffering of orcas in captivity, writes Kathleen Haase, who meets the company's executives today. Her aim - to stop the sale of package holidays to SeaWorld parks and expose cetacean captivity as cruel and unethical. more...

Nuclear power trumps democracy

Donnachadh McCarthy

9th October 2014

The Prostitute State The UK's political mainstream has performed a complete U-Turn in policy on nuclear power, culminating yesterday in the European Commission's approval of a £15-20 billion subsidy package for the Hinckley C project. Donnachadh McCarthy delves into the nuclear industry's deep and far-reaching political links. more...

Alfred Nobel would have wanted an environment prize

James Dyke

8th October 2014

A Nobel Prize for the Penan people of Sarawak, famous for defying the loggers to protect the rainforest on which they,a nd the world, depend? Photo: Friends of the Earth. Nobel's choice of prizes addressed the key disciplines of his time that conferred greatest benefit on mankind, writes James Dyke. To his initial selection an economics prize was later added - so what's to stop us adding a new one for sustainability - how mankind can live in harmony with planet Earth and all who sail on her? more...

Blogs

London's 'Tarpaulin Revolution' lives another day

Donnachadh McCarthy

20th October 2014

Occupy Democracy - the Day 2 kettle of the Head of Boris Johnson's Wardens, selecting who to get the police to arrest. Photo: Donnachadh McCarthy. Last night the police were in full force in London's Parliament Square, writes Donnachadh McCarthy - forcibly removing Occupy Democracy protestors and snatching sleeping bags, cardboard and tarpaulins as illegal 'sleeping equipment', apparently on direct orders from the Mayor, Boris Johnson. Yet the rally keeps on growing .... more...

Japanese knotweed - could a tiny insect tame the monster?

Kate Constantine

17th October 2014

Japanese knotweed makes short work of concrete and tarmac. In its native habitat, it has learnt to crack up volcanic rock. Photo: Rob Tanner. Since Japanese knotweed won a gold medal in 1847 as 'interesting new ornamental of the year', it has become far too much of a good thing, writes Kate Constantine. But could the oriental triffid be tamed following the UK introduction of a specialist pest from Japan's volcanic uplands? more...

Comment

To hit fossil fuel firms where it hurts, support divestment!

Franklin Ginn

20th October 2014

Are there more nasty surprises in store for fossil fuel investors? The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, 22nd June 2010. Photo: Oscar Garcia / via John Amos on Flickr. Fossil fuel companies are a risky investment thanks to the 2.8 trillion tonnes of 'unburnable' carbon in their reserves, writes Franklin Ginn. But there's an even stronger reason to support fossil fuel divestment: to erode their political power, which they use to block progress to a sustainable, low carbon future. more...

Less freedom in Westminster's Parliament Square than in Hong Kong!!

Donnachadh McCarthy

19th October 2014

The Occupy Democracy rally in London's Parliament Square last night. Photo: Nina Tailor / @ninatailor2. Donnachadh McCarthy went to Parliament Square yesterday to address a peaceful rally about the failings of British democracy. The intimidatory, violent and inflammatory police reaction only confirmed everything he had to say - as did the dignified restraint of the Occupy Democracy protestors. more...

Letters

Letter: water use need not stall desert solar power

Dr Gerry Wolff

25th August, 2010

CSP trough-based system Yes, pioneering concentrating solar power plants are thirsty facilities, but their water use requirements could be made dramatically less more...

Letter - Time to get serious with the EU Emission Trading Scheme

27th May, 2010

Mark Chadwick

Carbon dioxide emissions Mark Chadwick from Carbon Clear argues a full auctioning of ETS permits is needed if the trading scheme is to start working more...

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