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Interviews

Defending life! Jairo Restrepo, organic revolutionary

JuanFran Lopez / Ragmans Lane Farm

27th July 2015

Jairo Restrepo among the wild flowers of Spain. Photo: JuanFran Lopez. Jairo Restrepo is a leading champion of organic farming in Brazil, writes JuanFran Lopez, and now his influence has spread across the world. His mission too has expanded to include campaigning for the rights of small scale farmers, and an even wider project of economic, technological and societal transformation to put people at the centre of political power. more...

Yann Arthus Bertrand: 'There's something we are clearly missing'

Tadzio Mac Gregor

3rd July 2015

Portrait of Yann Arthus Bertrand. Photo: © Tadzio McGregor. French photographer and environmental activist, Yann Arthus Bertrand, author of 'The Earth from the Air', sets out his hopes and fears for the future in this interview with Tadzio Mac Gregor - and explains why, despite all the problems that afflict the world, he has no space for pessimism. more...

Two musicians' quest to save the forest people of Cameroon - Martin & Su of Baka Beyond

Matthew Newsome

10th June 2015

Flyer (cut) for the concert taking place in London this Sunday 14th June. Image: Baka Beyond. When Martin Cradick and Su Hart travelled to West Africa in 1992, little did they know the journey would set their lives on a whole new direction, writes Matthew Newsome. Inspired by the Baka people of Cameroon's rainforest and the joy that resonates through their music, they are now dedicated to saving this vulnerable people using their magical music to reach into people's hearts. more...

The American genocide, indigenous resistance and human survival: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

Stephyn Quirke

21st May 2015

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz speaking at the Left Forum, 20 March 2010. Photo: Thomas Good / NLN via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA). The Indigenous Peoples of North America are the survivors of a multi-century genocide that was still being deliberately waged in the 1950s and has still not stopped today, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz told Stephyn Quirke. But the fightback is on, and for the world to overcome both genocide and ecocide, the indigenous struggle must grow to encompass the mass of humanity. more...

Lead poisoning - fighting industrial pollution in Kenya is a dangerous business

Sophie Morlin-Yron

Monday 20 April 2015

Phyllis Omido, 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize winner for Africa, galvanized the community in Mombasa to shut down a smelter that was causing lead poisoning among its workers and local residents. (Photo: Goldman Environmental Prize) Lead poisoning from industrial pollution has imposed a terrible toll on Kenyans, writes Sophie Morlin-Yron, and single mother Phyllis Omido is no exception - lead from a nearby metal refinery badly damaged her own son's health. But it was when she decided to fight back against the polluters that a whole new realm of threats and dangers opened up. more...

'Water man of India' makes rivers flow again

Pramila Krishnan

8th April 2015

Rajendra Singh believes conservation is vital to combat future 'water wars' and climate change. Photo: Deccan Chronicle. The revival of traditional rainwater harvesting has restored flow to rivers in India's driest state, Rajasthan - thanks to the tireless efforts of Rajendra Singh, recent winner of a Stockholm water prize. And as Pramila Krishnan discovered in a fascinating meeting, Singh's techniques, and his philosophy, are of truly global significance. more...

Man on an Antarctic mission - taking a plunge for the Ross Sea

Yannic Rack

1st April 2015

Lewis Pugh swimming 500m in water with a temperature of 0°C off the coast of Peter I Island in the Bellinghausen Sea - one of 13 seas which surround Antarctica. Photo: lewispugh.com. How to campaign for the world's biggest marine protected area in Antarctica's freezing seas? If you're Lewis Pugh, the answer's a simple one: swim there! And before your hands have even recovered from the frostbite, fly off to Moscow to persuade the Kremlin to back the idea. Yannic Rack met the intrepid swimmer in a cosy London pub ... more...

Unlikely hero (or villain): Michael Mann, creator of the hockey stick graph

Brendan Montague / DeSmog UK

16th March 2015

Michael Mann on a Tundra Buggy looking for polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba (13th November 2010). Photo: via Michael Mann. Michael Mann will be remembered as the creator of the 'hockey stick' graph of rising global temperatures, which has put him forever in the crosshairs of climate change sceptics. But as Brendan Montague found, he is a curiously unlikely hero, or villain: rather a dedicated scientist living the American dream, who just happened, to his own surprise, to stumble on something big. more...

Taiwan indigenous activist - this illegal luxury hotel on our beach must go!

Glenn Smith

19th February 2015

The Mirabar Resort Village, illegally built on the the land of Taiwan's 'Amis indigenous People, Shanyuan beach. Photo: Glenn Smith. A huge hotel development has been built on a pristine beach belonging to the 'Amis, one of Taiwan's indigenous tribes, despite numerous court rulings confirming its illegality. Glenn Smith met 'Amis campaigner Sinsing, whose fight for justice began when the government handed out eviction notices to her community - and will continue until the hotel is razed and the beach restored. more...

Meet Malcolm, the man defending his town from the rising seas

Guy Shrubsole

11th February 2015

Malcolm Kerby, campaigning against a government as intransigent as the rising seas. Photo: Guy Shrubsole. As the seas rise, the government is doing little to help those whose homes are being engulfed beneath the waves, writes Guy Shrubsole - people like veteran campaigner Malcolm Kerby, who has already seen a whole street of his North Norfolk town lost to the rising waters. more...

Art Tanderup: How Nebraskans are winning the fight against Keystone XL

Kate Aronoff / Waging Nonviolence

30th January 2015

Art Tanderup and wife at Harvest the Hope. Photo: © HearNebraska.org via Flickr. Nebraska has become ground zero for the fight against Keystone XL, and Art Tanderup - farmer and retired schoolteacher - has become a leading voice in the struggle. He spoke to Kate Aronoff about the divisive impact of the pipeline on the local community, threats to the Ogallala Aquifer, and the urgent need to shift to clean, renewable energy sources. more...

Naomi Klein: A crisis this big changes everything

Oliver Tickell

21st January 2015

Naomi Klein. Photo: Resurgence. The world's collective failure to tackle climate change comes down to one big problem, says Naomi Klein: the clash of climate necessities against corporate power and a triumphant neo-liberal world order. So after decades of government dithering, she told Oliver Tickell, it's time for civil society to unite and build a radical justice-based movement for climate action. more...

Logging the flooded forests of Panama: Alana Husby

Kate Monson

9th January 2015

Alana Husby with local Kuna indigenous women. Alana Husby has sawdust in her blood. A fifth generation log and lumber person from Canada, she was ‘flipping wood' as a teenager, and now she's in Panama running the region's biggest underwater logging company, employing local Kuna Indians to fish tree trunks out of flooded forests. Kate Monson met Alana in Oxford while negotiating a 'green' timber deal ... more...

The melting Arctic - John Nissen's emergency call to action

Tomás d'Ornellas

15th December 2015

John Nissen speaking at AMEG's COP20 press conference. Photo: still from video on unfccc6.meta-fusion.com/ . The Earth faces an imminent crisis caused by runaway Arctic warming. So says climate campaigner John Nissen, who travelled to COP20 in Lima to impress the dangers on delegates - and urge them to emergency action to cool the Arctic before it's too late. Tomás d'Ornellas, editor of Tecnews.pe, met him there ...
more...

River of Life: Ian Player, saviour of the white rhino

Nicola Graydon

5th December 2014

Ian and Magqubu minding the nightly fire to protect against predators. Photo: www.trevorbarrettphoto.co.uk/ . The white rhino is in deep trouble after a new surge of poaching. But the fact that it's there at all is largely thanks to one man: Ian Player, who saved the white rhino from near-certain extinction in the 1960's. Earlier this year Nicola Graydon met Dr Player at his home in South Africa, to record his last major interview. more...

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