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Climate change through the eyes of an Inuit boy

Ecologist

29th June, 2009

A Canadian film about an Inuit boy's views on climate change and cultural transformation wins prestigious Commonwealth film prize

Greg Hemmings, a young Canadian film-maker, won First Prize in this year's Commonwealth Vision Awards at a ceremony held at the Commonwealth Club in London.

The Awards, open to filmmakers under 35 across the 53 member states of the Commonwealth, is now in its eighth year.

Hemmings' entry 'Papikatuk', looks at the effects of climate change and cultural transformation in a small community in the Canadian Arctic region of Nunavik. It is narrated by a young Inuit boy named Papikatuk.

The film is a poignant and beautiful account of how rapidly the world is changing, climatically and culturally, for communities around the world.

You can watch the film by scrolling down the page and clicking on the link below.

The second prize was won by Pooja Pottenkulam of India/UK and Ambjorn Elder of UK/Sweden for their joint entry 'The Boy Who Spoke Moomoo', an animated and allegorical story illustrating how, according to reports by UNESCO, by 2100 half of the more than 7,000 languages spoken on Earth may disappear. Many of these languages have never been recorded or documented. The result? A wealth of knowledge about about human nature, history, culture and the natural environment is also lost.

Four other short-listed entries came from Uganda, India, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

The Commonwealth Vision Awards launched in 2001, are jointly organised by the Royal Commonwealth Society and the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association.

 

Papikatuk from Hemmings House on Vimeo.

 

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