The Ecologist

 
Seedtime by Scott Chaskey is published by Rodale Press.
Seedtime by Scott Chaskey is published by Rodale Press.
More articles about
Related Articles

Manipulating the seeds of life

Karl Grossman

4th March 2014

Seeds are the gift of nature and past generations to us, and our gift to the future. Karl Grossman reviews 'Seedtime' - and finds that we must make that gift wholesome and fruitful - not a Pandora's box of genetically modified horrors.

Is it at all wise or beneficial for a corporation with a scarred legacy to control almost one-third of the global seed trade?

Just out is a brilliant book, highly important and beautifully written, by Scott Chaskey, a Long Island, N.Y. farmer - for 25 years he has run the Peconic Land Trust's Quail Hill Farm in Amagansett - poet and crusader for local, organic, sustainable agriculture. 

Seedtime: On the History, Husbandry, Politics, and Promise of Seeds  is about something humanity has been deeply involved in and dependent upon throughout our time on earth: seeds.

Chaskey, in Seedtime, begins by telling of entering as a farmer into "the realm of seeds ... to witness a kind of magical reality." But that magical reality is under threat, he declares:

"As we face the challenges of climate change and the loss of prime agricultural soils, we need a diverse seed supply to counter the unpredictable and the unknown. Instead, we continue to lose plant species­and the seeds of the future­at an alarming rate."

Homegenization versus adaptation

"A seed", he explains, "contains an embryo, a miniature plant awaiting the moment of transition. Seed leaves store food within the endosperm­the seed coat­that will nourish the seedling plant when it emerges."

"A plant's coming into being, or maturation is such a quiet progression that we tend to focus on the fruit, the colorful prize of production and the vessel of taste."

"Our entire food supply is a gift", a result of the emergence of flowering plants 140 million years ago, he says, and "our health and food futures are entwined with the way we choose to nurture or manipulate the seeds of that natural revolution."

"The value of conserving biodiversity cannot be overstated," he relates. "Biodiversity is the source of our food ... Our increasing tendency to homogenize all aspects of our ecosystems limits our ability to adapt."

GMOs endanger the seeds of the future

Today the food supply for humanity is endangered­ notably by genetic engineering or modification, Chaskey writes. "The altered organism, a GMO, is the result of a laboratory process by which a gene (or genes) of one species is inserted into another species. This process is fundamentally different from traditional breeding."

In genetic modification, genes of animals, plants, fish, insects, among other life forms, are combined.  A giant in this is Monsanto which synchronizes its production of GMO seeds with the production of pesticides it manufactures.

Also, there is a push to "limit diversity" of seeds which links to, among other things, "consolidation in the seed industry" and "mass marketing considerations."

Corporate dominance of seeds

Monsanto, further, has been a leader in patenting GMO seeds. Chaskey provides a detailed history of Monsanto, founded in 1901 by a "self-taught chemist" who named it for his wife whose maiden name was Monsanto, and how it became the leading producer of cancer-causing PCBs and 2,4,5-T, "the basis for Agent Orange", the poison used as a defoliant in the Vietnam War, as well as DDT.

"Is it at all wise or beneficial for a corporation with a scarred legacy ... to control almost one-third of the global seed trade?" asks Chaskey.

And he tells of how the Monsanto GMO seeds have been "developed to perform in tandem with heavy inputs of chemical fertilizers and pesticides." Indeed, an early GMO seed was "Monsanto's first ‘Roundup Ready' soybean, genetically modified to resist the application of Monsanto's foundational herbicide product, Roundup."

A global challenge

There is a global challenge to GMOs, notes Chaskey. "The planting of GMO crops is largely banned in the 28-nation European Union", he relates.

In California, individual counties have banned GMO crops and "GMO-Free activists are aggressively campaigning throughout this country and worldwide." There are now, however, hundreds of millions of acres, "concentrated in the US, Canada, Argentina, Brazil and China, planted with GMO crops.

"The health of our fields, the health of our plant communities, and the future of our food supply will depend on whether, as a global culture, we can learn to respect the whole of the biological community, and to accept our role as citizens of it (and to honor those who still retain the connection)", writes Chaskey.

"May we continue to cultivate our fields with the imperishable mystery in mind and to playfully, carefully follow these seeds and nurture them."

 


 

Seedtime: On the History, Husbandry, Politics and Promise of Seeds is written by Scott Chaskey, and published by Rodale Press - the press that has been central for decades to the organic food movement - at $17.99 (hardback).

Quail Hill Farm in 1988 became the first CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) farm in New York State. Chaskey and the other farmers at Quail Hill are aided by apprentices and volunteers in growing locally organic food­with good seeds.

Karl Grossman, Professor of Journalism at the State University of New York/College of New York, is the author of the book, The Wrong Stuff: The Space's Program's Nuclear Threat to Our Planet

Grossman is an associate of the media watch group Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR). He is a contributor to Hopeless: Barack Obama and the Politics of Illusion.

This article was first published on Counterpunch.

 

 

Previous Articles...

ECOLOGIST COOKIES

Using this website means you agree to us using simple cookies.

More information here...

 

FOLLOW
THE ECOLOGIST