The Ecologist

 
350.org

Campaign groups Avaaz and 350.org will present a petition to world leaders at the Rio Summit in June

More articles about
Related Articles

TAKE ACTION to help end government subsidies for dirty energy

Grace Philip

25th May, 2012

Global grassroots movement, 350.org is gathering support to persuade world leaders to stop subsidising fossil fuels at the Rio Earth Summit

World leaders are feeding carbon emissions into the atmosphere and making clean energy the more expensive option by paying subsidies to fossil fuel industries, such as oil, gas and coal. But 350.org are calling for that to stop by applying global pressure on the world's leaders and challenging them to end these subsidies at the Rio Earth Summit in June.

According to 350.org, this year our governments will pay hundreds of billions of dollars in subsidising these harmful energy sources that contribute to climate disasters such as drought, floods, fires and rising sea levels. This is money that could be much better spent - in renewable energy, public health, education and in energy efficiency.

For 350.org, the answer is reasonable and simple - stop subsidising these industries. 'It's time for us, and our political leaders, to connect the dots,' says Bill McKibben, member of team 350.org team.
In fact, the answer is so simple that the leaders themselves agree (or at least they did). In 2009, the G20 agreed to phase out these subsidies in the ‘medium term.' But unfortunately, none of these states have made good on this commitment. ‘The political power of the polluters scares them,' argues McKibben.

With the help of the planetary network, Avaaz, 350.org are rallying for global support to inspire action at the Rio Earth Summit. By gathering signatures, 350.org are demanding that world leaders are firm against the fossil fuel industries and that they finally bring about the much-needed change. Already, there are half a million people signed on from the US. But to be truly effective, 350.org need international support. It is, after all, a global problem.

The petition aims to push for legislation to remove $113 billion worth of subsidies in American fossil fuel companies in the next decade. Achieving this goal would decrease carbon dioxides emissions greatly and would then be a great step in overcoming the effects of climate change, helping to protect people around the world as well as future generations.

The signatures will be delivered to the world leaders on the 18th June when they arrive at the Rio Summit, and 350.org are thinking-up ways to make sure they are unable to ignore it.

TAKE ACTION: Answer the call to end subsidies to fossil fuel industries and sign the petition.

Add to StumbleUpon
READ MORE...
HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Island President - one man's battle to combat climate change and save his country
The film follows the struggle between Maldives President Mohammed Nasheed and sea level rise. As the Maldives continue to be threatened by climate change, Nasheed realises it is time to take action before his country disappears under the ocean.
HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE
Steve Kretzman 'We won the Keystone XL campaign because of nonviolent protest'
The founder of Oil Change International, Steve Kretzmann, talks about the tight bond between politicians and the fossil fuel industry, 'fracking', and why Occupy is now the anti-Tea Party
INVESTIGATION
Tar sands: tearing the flesh from the Earth
As the price of oil increases again, Canada's tar sands once more look like a giant cash cow to the industry. Now, the only thing standing between the 400 ton bulldozers and rampant environmental destruction may be a small group of First Nations people...
INVESTIGATION
Oil deal 'threatens Ugandan biodiversity'
The discovery of oil in Uganda was a blessing to the impoverished East African country. But before the oil has even started pumping, disputes over tax, accusations of corruption and fears for the environment plague the sector. Alice Klein reports from Hoima
NEWS ANALYSIS
David v Goliath: Chevron plots to avoid cleaning up oil pollution in Amazon rainforest
Ecuador government urged not to give in to pressure from the US oil giant Chevron to drop record $18 billion fine for its part in the 'Chernobyl of the Amazon'

 

Previous Articles...

ECOLOGIST COOKIES

Using this website means you agree to us using simple cookies.

More information here...

 

FOLLOW
THE ECOLOGIST