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IAEA Experts at Unit 4 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, 17th April 2013, as part of a mission to review Japan's plans to decommission the facility. Photo: IAEA Imagebank.
IAEA Experts at Unit 4 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, 17th April 2013, as part of a mission to review Japan's plans to decommission the facility. Photo: IAEA Imagebank.
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Fukushima - we need health studies now!

Joseph Mangano & Janette Sherman

2nd August 2014

A massive health crisis is following the 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, write Joseph Mangano & Janette Sherman - not just in Japan but around the world. But the health impacts remains woefully under-studied. Scientists must wake up and undertake serious research without delay.

Not knowing Fukushima's health toll only raises the chance that such a disaster will be repeated in the future.

Over three years since the Fukushima nuclear disaster, there is virtually no health research being conducted or released on harm to the Japanese.

An April 2014 report by the UN agency UNSCEAR (the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation ) tried to sweep the issue under the rug, predicting any harmful effects of the catastrophe is "unlikely".

"Based on this assessment", said UNSCEAR Chair Carl-Magnus Larsson, "the Committee does not expect significant changes in future cancer statistics that could be attributed to radiation exposure from the accident."

In its report, 'Levels and effects of radiation exposure due to the nuclear accident after the 2011 great east-Japan earthquake and tsunami', UNSCEAR made a very broad assumption about the worst nuclear catastrophe in history (or worst since Chernobyl) - and did this before research was done.

However, a local health study raises alarm bells. Fukushima Medical University found 46% of local children have a pre-cancerous nodules or cysts, and 130 have thyroid cancer, vs. 3 expected at normal levels of incidence.

Incredibly, the University corrupts science by asserting the multiple meltdown of nuclear reactors and radioactive releases played no role in these high figures.

Excess deaths - not just in Japan

But Japanese studies must go far beyond childhood thyroid diseases. Also Japan isn't the only site to study, as the fallout from the meltdown spread across the northern hemisphere.

In 2011, we estimated 13,983 excess US deaths occurred in the 14 weeks after Fukushima, when fallout levels were highest - roughly the same after Chernobyl in 1986. We used only a sample of deaths available at that time, and cautioned not to conclude that fallout caused all of these deaths.

Final figures became available this week. The 2010-2011 change in deaths in the four months after Fukushima was +2.63%, vs. +1.54% for the rest of the year. This difference translates to 9,158 excess deaths - not an exact match for the 13,983 estimate, but a substantial spike nonetheless.

Again, without concluding that only Fukushima caused these deaths, some interesting patterns emerged:

  • The five Pacific and West Coast states, with the greatest levels of Fukushima fallout in the US, had an especially large excess.
  • So did the five neighboring states (Arizona, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, and Utah), which received the next highest levels.


Most of the spring 2011 mortality increase were people over 80. Many of these elderly were in frail health. One possibility is that the added exposure to radioactive poison sped the dying process.

This stuff is deadly!

Fukushima radiation is the same as fallout from atom bomb explosions, releasing over 100 chemicals not found in nature. The radioactive chemicals enter the body as a result of precipitation that gets into the food chain. Once in the body, these particles harm or kill cells, leading to disease or death.

Once-skeptical health officials now admit even low doses of radiation are harmful. Studies showed X-rays to pregnant women's abdomens raised the risk of the child dying of cancer, ending the practice.

Bomb fallout from Nevada caused up to 212,000 Americans to develop thyroid cancer. Nuclear weapons workers are at high risk for a large number of cancers.

Rather than the UN Committee making assumptions based on no research, medical research on changes in Japanese disease and death rates are needed - now, in all parts of Japan.

Similar studies should be done in nations like Korea, China, eastern Russia, and the US. Not knowing Fukushima's health toll only raises the chance that such a disaster will be repeated in the future.

 


 

Joseph Mangano is Executive Director of the Radiation and Public Health Project.

Janette D. Sherman MD is an internist and toxicologist, and editor of Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment.

This article was originally published on CounterPunch.

 

 

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