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Pickles appoints himself Lord of the Wind Farms

Rebecca Cooke

17th April 2014

Wind turbines can be gorgeous - but not to Mr Pickles. Photo: Nick Ford via Flickr.com. Turbulence lies ahead for the UK's wind energy sector, writes Rebecca Cooke, as key Conservative MPs appear to be launching a hardline attack on onshore wind farms in the run up to the General Election. more...

Green or white? Planted or painted roofs can cool buildings

Gurdane Virk

15th April 2015

White roofs are widespread in Bermuda, where they help keep buildings cool under the hot sun. Photo: Acroterion / Wikimedia Commons. As the world inexorably warms, Roger Kemp shows how we can help to keep our buildings cool with roof gardens - or just with white paint. And if enough people do it, entire cities will become more cooler, more pleasant places to be when hot weather hits ... more...

Wind power booms in oil-rich Texas

Ian Partridge

13th April 2014

A sunrise industry: wind turbines in Texas. Photo: Chrishna via Flickr.com. One evening in March, wind delivered over 10,000 MW of electricity to Texas's power grid, almost 30% of total demand, reports Ian Partridge, and another 18,500 MW of capacity is under construction. So just why is Texas going so big on wind? more...

Hollywood goes big on climate change

Kieran Cooke

12th April 2014

The UN's Ban Ki-moon with Arnold Schwarzenegger, 2012 Global Advocate of the Year for his work on climate change. Image: UN Photo / Rick Bajornas. It's billed as 'the biggest story of our time', writes Kieran Cooke. This weekend viewers of Showtime, the US cable channel, will be watching the first of an 8-part documentary series on climate change: some of the biggest names in Hollywood are involved. more...

Panda Sutra - the ups and downs of getting grumpy bears to have sex

Forbes Howie

11th April 2014

Too sexy for my shirt? Tian Tian yawning at Edinburgh Zoo. Photo: gavin proc via flickr.com. Just why do giant pandas find it so difficult to mate? It's because they're in captivity, and so little of their wild habitat survives. But in Edinburgh zoo, writes Forbes Howie,
scientists are hard at work to get Tian Tian pregnant ...
more...

When life becomes a shadow - after nuclear catastrophe

Robert Jacobs

8th April 2014

In the Chernobyl / Pripyat Exclusion Zone, February 2008. Photo: Pedro Moura Pinheiro via Flickr.com. Those caught up in nuclear disasters suffer many times over, writes Robert Jacobs. Ill-health and early death aside, they are also cut off from their former communities, identities and family life, and the victims of social and medical discrimination. more...

Africa without rhinos would be different, and poorer

Rachel Nuwer

6th April 2014

Africa would not be the same without them. Rhinos at Kariega Game Reserve. Photo: Clem Evans via Flickr.com. If rhinos are driven to extinction in the wild, Africa's landscapes and ecosystems would be very different, reports Rachel Nuwer. The activities of this mega-herbivore diversify plant life and create prime grazing spots for other animals. more...

England's smog - Saharan sand is the least of our problems

Rob MacKenzie

3rd March 2014

Sandstorm at sunset in the Sahara - Ksar Ghilane, Tunisia. Photo: Kirk K via Flickr.com. As England chokes in Level 10 smog, Rob MacKenzie says we shouldn't worry too much about headline-grabbing sand from the Sahara. Far more insidious and damaging to health are the fumes from our own cars and lorries. more...

The IPCC and Osbornomics - a dangerous disconnect

Molly Scott Cato

2nd April 2014

Coal fired power stations will be among those to benefit from the freezing of the 'carbon floor price'. Photo: Emilian Robert Vicol via Flickr.com. The IPCC's latest report makes a stark contrast with Osborne's recent budget, writes Molly Scott Cato. It was all about sacrificing our future for short term benefit - when as the IPCC makes clear, what we need is the precise opposite. more...

When rewilding isn't mad - guanacos can transform the espinal of Chile

Meredith Root-Bernstein

27th March 2014

Guanaco in Chile's Torres del Payne National Park. Photo: Fernando Venegas Traba via Flickr.com. The degraded Mediterranean-like savannas of Central Chile are in serious need of re-wilding, writes Meredith Root-Bernstein. And that means bringing back the guanaco, hunted out 500 years ago, to browse on the thorny acacia scrub. more...

Saving Madagascar's lemurs

Ian Colquhoun

25th March 2014

An endangered Red ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata ruber) in Madagascar. Photo: Ronald McGuire via Flickr.com. 'Brand lemur' could draw much needed ecotourism spending to Madagascar, writes Ian Colquhoun - benefiting local communities, and providing the funds needed to save lemurs from the very real threat of extinction. more...

The omni-benefits of regenerative pasture

Natasha Giddings

21st March 2014

Early stages of Holistic Planned Grazing with Dexter cattle awaiting their daily move at Haye Farm, Worcestershire. Photo: Stuart Norgrove. Managing grasslands in a way that mimics natural grazing by wild animals improves water infiltration, reduces erosion, conserves nutrients, reduces costs, raises production and increases profits, writes Natasha Giddings. Why isn't everyone doing it? more...

Gandhi's nightmare has come true

Subhankar Banerjee

18th March 2014

A regular Sunday shopping in Chennai, India. Photo: McKay Savage via Flickr.com. The era of mass consumption has reached India, bringing about a frenzy of over-consumption, pollution and ecological havoc. But so long as there's money to be made, asks Subhankar Banerjee, why worry about climate change? more...

Beijing's $5bn tree project - will it cut pollution?

Jun Yang

16th March 2014

Tree losing its leaves in the Beijing smog. Photo:  Philip McMaster via Flickr.com. Beijing is to plant trees over an area 200 times the size of Central Park in the city's latest effort to neutralise its choking pollution. But Jun Yang asks - how much will the trees really help, unless accompanied by drastic reductions in emissions? more...

Bolivia and Britain - a tale of two floods

Maddy Ryle

11th March 2014

Before the rain: Laguna Colorada, Bolivia. Photo: Robin Fernandes via Flickr.com. Living between southern England and Bolivia, Maddy Ryle finds inconsistent media attitudes in reporting extreme weather and climate change - and searches out new narratives that engage and empower communities across the world. more...

First Americans lived on Beringia for thousands of years

Scott Armstrong Elias

7th March 2014

Traditional qamutik (sled) on Cape Dorset. Photo: Ansgar Walk / Wikimedia Commons. The ancestors of America's Indians lived in Beringia - the land exposed during the last ice age that is now the Bering Strait - for millennia, genetic studies have determined. Scott Armstrong Elias reports. more...

Woods and trees are functioning parts of a living landscape

Mike Townsend

6th March 2014

Trees and hedgerows mean less run-off and erosion, reducing flooding and siltation downstream. Photo: Coed Cymru - coedcymru.org.uk/ . Trees, woodlands and hedgerows do much more than enhance the appearance of Britain's rural landscapes, writes Mike Townsend. They diminish flooding, reduce erosion, assist water infiltration, enhance biodiversity - and we need more of them! more...

Are we recreating a 3 million year-old past?

Richard Pancost

2nd March 2014

A family of Columbian Mammoths at the La Brea Tarpits Zoo (Pliocene section). Photo: Steve Rawley via Flickr.com. Our emissions of greenhouse gases may end up recreating the conditions of the Pliocene era of 2.6 to 5.3 million years ago. Warm and wet, life could still thrive, writes Richard Pancost. As for a 40 metre rise in sea level ... more...

We must protect NHS democracy

Caroline Lucas

28th February 2014

Caroline Lucas marching for the NHS. Photo: Green Party of England & Wales. The UK's Coalition Government told us it wanted to hand control of the NHS to patients. In truth, writes Caroline Lucas MP, it is attacking NHS democracy on every side. more...

Human rights and the environment

Gabriel Moran

27th February 2014

Rediscovering our place in the Universe: a couple at Burning Man 2012, Washoe County, Nevada, USA. Photo: Duncan Rawlinson via Flickr.com. Are human rights separable from the wider rights of other living beings, the environment and the Universe? Gabriel Moran finds that humans need to re-assert their central position in the world and build an encompassing moral responsibility. more...

Genetic study shows we can breed TB-resistant cows

Liz Glass

24th February 2014

Cattle near Oxford. Photo: Alcalaina via Flickr.com. The debate on protecting cattle from TB has become polarised between supporters of killing badgers, and vaccination. But as Liz Glass reports, there is another solution: breeding cattle with innate TB resistance. more...

Organic farming benefits biodiversity

Lindsay Turnbull

19th February 2014

Planting out onion seedlings at Sandy Lane Farm, and organic farm in Oxfordshire, UK. Photo: Sandy lane Farm. Organic farming really is wildlife friendly, new research from Oxford University has found, with far higher species diversity on organic farms than conventional ones. Lindsay Turnbull reports on her findings ... more...

Xocolatl: sweet bitter Love (and Spicy!)

Annie Levy

14th February 2014

All the ingredients of a hot, spicy Valentine's night. Photo: Annie Levy. Hot date? Annie Levy shares some bitter-sweet, spicy secrets for a very special Valentine's night ... guaranteed rhino horn free, and not tested on animals. more...

Roadkill pheasant and dumplings

Annie Levy

11th February 2014

Why did the pheasant cross the road? Photo: johndal via Flickr.com. Roadkill pheasant, quail and dumplings ... Annie Levy embarks on a culinary trip down memory lane to the raw sounds of Bonnie Prince Billy. more...

Wild salmon starve at sea as North Atlantic warms

Chris Todd

8th February 2014

Salmon leaping at the Falls of Shinn, Scotland. Salmon need to be in good condition to return to their up-river spawning grounds. Photo: Gary Henderson via Flickr.com. The migrations of wild salmon over thousands of kilometres are an enduring mystery, writes Chris Todd - as are the reasons for a steep and alarming decline in salmon weight, fat and overall condition. more...

The many faces of Real Farming

Colin Tudge and Graham Harvey

4th February 2014

Wheat among the trees - agroforestry at Wakelyns Farm. Photo: Wakelyns Farm. Many contemporary farmers - despite a hostile economic environment - are finding new ways to make ecological farming viable. Colin Tudge and Graham Harvey have tracked down some inspiring examples ... more...

Big old trees grow faster, absorb more carbon

Adeshola Ore

28th January 2014

Ancient tree - possibly a Black cottonwood -  on Big Tree Hike on Vancouver's North Shore. Photo: Rob Baxter via Flickr.com. Large, older trees have been found to grow faster and absorb carbon dioxide more rapidly than younger, smaller trees, writes Adeshola Ore - contrary to the previous view that trees’ growth slowed as they developed. more...

Learning the weird and wonderful ropes

Jenny Jones

23rd January 2014

Jenny Jones / Baroness Moulsecoomb. Photo: Tanoshimi / Wikimedia Commons. The House of Lords is full of surprises - arcane rituals, labyrinthine corridors, mysterious procedures ... but also help, support and friendship from unexpected quarters, says Green peer Jenny Jones. more...

GMO-free bioscience to feed Africa's farming families

Howard-Yana Shapiro

19th January 2014

Baobab Tree (Adansonia digitata), Mapangubwe National Park, South Africa. The tree is a rich source of nutritious fruit for wildlife and humans. Photo: Martin Heigan via Flickr.com. For 600 million rural people across Africa, the food they grow is the food they eat. A new plant breeding academy in Kenya is using advanced genomic technologies to produce more robust and nutritious crops, writes Howard-Yana Shapiro. more...

Stuck in the Antarctic ice we set out to study

Erik van Sebille

13th January 2014.

Chinese arrival at the Shokalskiy. From video by Intrepid Science. Antarctica is a desolate place. That much we know, but nothing prepares you for it until you actually get there, writes Erik can Sebille, recently escaped from an icy imprisonment. more...

Power for the people!

Ellie Harrison

9th January 2014

Ellie Harrison campaigning for a publicly owned railway system. Photo: Robin Prime. Ellie Harrison explains how her concerns about climate change led to her founding two dynamic campaigns to make Britain's vital national infrastructure publicly owned and accountable once more. more...

Puerto Rico's years of unseasonal rain

La Shawn Pagán

7th January 2014

Flooded street in Dorado, Puerto Rico. Photo: LaShawn Pagan. The world's weather news is dominated by storms in Europe and extreme cold in North America. But as La Shawn Pagán reports, Puerto Rico has just had 85 inches of rain in one month, and its three wettest years ever, more...

Africa's elephant massacre and the growing ivory frenzy

Richard Schiffman

6th January 2014

Elephants at Sangha-Mbaéré, Central African Republic. Photo: Nicolas Rost via Flickr.com. Carved ivory elephants may already outnumber living elephants, which are being slaughtered at the unsustainable rate of 35,000 per year. Richard Schiffman reports from the Central African Republic. more...

Bolivia: harshening climate meets traditional knowledge

Sian Cowman

30th December 2013

Doña Pascuala’s houses and yard, Lancaya. Photo: Sian Cowman. High altitude regions near the equator are highly vulnerable to climate change - as are marginalised communities. Sian Cowman reports on how resilience strategies - old and new - are helping one Andean community to survive a changing climate. more...

Communites decide - fracking or renewables?

Rebecca Cooke

24th December 2013

A solar farm in open countryside near Lostwithiel, Cornwall. Photo: bobchin1941 via Flikr. Over £1 billion could be paid out by frackers to appease local communities in the UK. Yet Rebecca Cooke finds that wind and solar offers local people a better return ... more...

Dan Box - The Carteret Islands

Dan Box Blog - Paradise lost

Dan Box

14th May, 2009

DANBOX_Arrivals.jpg Dan Box reports from a community in its death throes, as the Carteret islanders pack up their homes and prepare to become the world’s first climate change refugees more...

Dan Box Blog: Morning in Tinputz

Dan Box

29th April, 2009

I slept in my clothes last night, on the bare wooden floor of one of the houses the first boatload of people to be evacuated from the Carteret Islands are building for their families. It was a jet-black night in the small clearing hacked out amid the jungle, the dark broken only by our two candles and the lights of Fireflies jigging in the trees. more...

The Evacuation Begins

Dan Box

22nd April, 2009

first arrivals at Tinputz.jpg Dan Box is on-site to witness the world's first climate refugees being evacuated due to rising sea levels more...

Other Blogs

Independent living in Canada

February 14th, 2013

by Eagle Gamma

Eagle Gamma profiles an ethnographer who chose life off-the-grid, and found true independence..... more...

Indonesia's Sumatran tiger threatened by development of last jungle strongholds

Dr. Julian Bloomer

4th September, 2012

Sumatran tiger As politicians encourage development around the Kerinci Seblat National Park, Dr. Julian Bloomer explores how the area's endangered species can be protected more...

Creating the future: How 'Zero Carbon Britain' is inspiring positivity in today's artists

Paul Allen

16th August, 2012

Zero Carbon Britain 2030 The Centre for Alternative Technology's Emergence Summit must develop positive versions of the future, as if we can't imagine it - there won't be one, says Paul Allen more...

Ewan Kingston

I did London to Sydney without flying. Here's how

Ewan Kingston

16th April, 2010

Ewan in front of a coach Our well-grounded Kiwi reflects on his six month (almost flightless) odyssey from London to New Zealand, and answers all the usual questions on travel without wings more...

I failed. I caught a plane

Ewan Kingston

3rd February, 2010

A plane ready for boarding Thousands of miles by train, coach, bus, boat and foot and, at the last hurdle, Ewan finds that there's no way to cross the Tasman Sea except on metal wings... more...

Bali to Australia by catamaran

Ewan Kingston

18th December, 2009

View from catamaran Though it was slow, choppy, wet and tiring, Ewan looks back on his wind-powered crossing to Australia as an experience worth every minute more...

Jeremy Smith

Inspiring solutions are out there, you just have to look

Jeremy Smith

25th October, 2009

Jeremy Blog image The 350.org events last Saturday on the International Day of Climate Action give us cause for hope. As Jeremy Smith is discovering, there are thousands of inspiring stories out there about people making a difference more...

It's ecotourism, but not as we know it

Jeremy Smith

5th October, 2009

Jeremy Blog image Ecotourism is not simply about minimising your negative impact. There are places you can go where your presence (and money) can make a positive difference too
more...

Ivili - new video website for sharing green tech ideas

Jeremy Smith

14th September, 2009

Jeremy Blog image There are plenty of small scale, locally appropriate innovations out there. Jeremy Smith has set up a video archive and social network that puts all the stories and advice together
more...

Gaian Economics

A green tax? James Tobin would be spinning in his grave

Gaian Economics

3rd September, 2009

Gaian Economics Lord Adair Turner - head of the FSA and the Climate Change Committe - has ruffled feathers by suggesting a tax on currency trading. Here's why more...

When it comes to work, less is more

Gaian Economics

18th August, 2009

Gaian Economics Why don't we follow the French model and take the whole month of August as holiday? It may help strengthen our economy more...

Mr. Bean to explain quantitative easing policy

Molly Scott Cato

16th July, 2009

Gaian Economics The deputy-director of the Bank of England is on a national tour to convince us of the seriousness of its policies to ease the recession. Molly Scott Cato can't wait for the punchline more...

Transition Culture

Five amazing things you never knew about potatoes

Transition Culture

6th July, 2009

Transition Culture Inspired by digging up some home grown new potatoes on a July afternoon Rob Hopkins is running a special competition - to win one of his potatoes... more...

Song lyrics for a better world

Transition Culture

29th June, 2009

Transition Culture In their new song 'Inaugural Trams', the Super Furry Animals capture a moment from a post carbon future more...

Transition meets local government

Transition Culture

24th June, 2009

Transition Culture What can happen when a Transition Initiative and its local authority work together: the Stroud story more...

Jonathon Porritt

Sarkozy deserves applause for his stance on growth

Jonathon Porritt

23rd September, 2009

Jonathon Porritt Few people in policy work have nice things to say about the Treasury, especially if you produce reports challenging economic growth. So Sarkozy's recent move on GDP is welcome more...

Have NGOs sold out?

Jonathon Porritt

13th July 2009

Jonathon Porritt Accusations that NGOs have got far too cosy with big business have been around for years. But where does the blame really lie? more...

Ecologist Leader

Recessions are unsustainable, but they sure cut emissions

Mark Anslow

30th March, 2010

editor's blog The dramatic cuts in UK emissions suggested by the Government's preliminary figures are staggering - but we would be wrong to celebrate them more...

Copenhagen: concession and compromise

Mark Anslow

18th December, 2009

cop15 Climate negotiations are always a balancing act. But the global atmosphere is not a politician, and it won't forgive us if we get this wrong more...

Shame on the 'climategate' scientists

Mark Anslow

27th November, 2009

Ecologist Editor Mark Anslow explores the fallout from the leaked email exchanges between climate scientists more...

Environmental Law Foundation

Corby judgment: do birth defects mean nothing?

Debbie Tripley

21st August, 2009

A handful of brave, convinced mothers fought their local council to make it pay for polluting their environment and causing their children birth defects. But has anyone learned anything from this landmark ruling? more...

Atlantic Rising

Atlantic Rising: creating a fashion for guilt-free fur

Lynn Morris

11th October, 2010

fur fashion on sale Can fashion fur be guilt free? A project in Louisiana believes the answer is yes - if you are wearing swamp rat more...

Atlantic Rising: Living on the edge on Nantucket Island in the US

Lynn Morris

28th September, 2010

Coastal erosion Homes are being moved and maps redrawn as coastal erosion eats away at an island off Massachusetts
more...

Atlantic Rising: sea level rise threatens the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela

Will Lorimer

1st September, 2010

Venezuela Rising sea levels are forcing the migration of indigenous peoples and threatening the freshwater ecosystem of catfish and piranha found in the Orinoco Delta near the coast of Venezuela more...

Greening my office

Greening my office: choosing an ethical pension

Sylvia Sunshine

13th January, 2011

Sylvia takes a step towards financial security with her premier pension payment. But can she keep a clean conscience at the same time? more...

Greening my office: can't we all just go camping instead of jetting off overseas?

Sylvia Sunshine

17th August, 2010

As her colleagues jet off to sunnier climes, Sylvia tackles the thorny issue of eco holidays - but will she pluck up the courage to confront her boss over his second home? more...

Greening my office: I got them to switch the heating off!

Sylvia Sunshine

9th July, 2010

thermostat Sylvia scores her first eco success - persuading her sceptical boss that heating an unoccupied portion of the office is a terrible waste of resources more...

Laura Laker

Life without supermarkets: community action is the best way to beat them

Laura Laker

10th August, 2010

Community garden A hypermarket victory in Hackney demonstrates how local groups can help protect community shops... more...

Life without supermarkets: forget posh organic shops; check out food co-ops

Laura Laker

13th July, 2010

Money To keep prices down, Laura shops around and gives food co-ops a whirl... more...

Life without supermarkets: escaping choice overload

Laura Laker

14th June, 2010

food co-ops Laura Laker discovers the joys of farmers' markets, the convenience of vegboxes, and the horror of plans for a nearby Tesco Metro that will threaten her local corner shop more...

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