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'We won't be here forever' - Cambodian forest defender immortalised on film

Fran Lambrick

2nd October 2014

Chut Wutty under attack by military personnel in Cambodia after burning a store of illegal timber. Five months later, he was murdered by persons unknown at a logging camp in the Cardomom mountains. Photo: Fran Lambrick. Film maker Fran Lambrick was there to record Cambodian forest defender Chut Wutty's burning of a store of illegal logs. But she didn't expect to be filming an attempt on his life. Five months later, Chut was murdered in a remote logging camp. But his beliefs live on in an extraordinary film. more...

Farm waste and mushrooms challenge plastic, concrete, steel

Sophie Morlin-Yron

29th September 2014

This handsome tower was built from bricks made with farm and forestry waste bound together by fungal myceliae. Now, it's being composted. Photo: Sophie Morlin-Yron. Isn't it daft it is to use plastics that last for centuries to make short-life packaging? Now there's an alternative, writes Sophie Morlin-Yron - using fungi to bind farm and forestry waste into strong, non-toxic, complex forms. When the job is done, the material can be safely burnt or composted - and it even works for buildings ... more...

Putting people at the heart of climate-friendly buildings

John Alker

24th September 2014

Green and pleasant - GPT head office, Sydney. Photo: Woods Bagot. Energy efficiency in office buildings struggles to gain the attention of top management, writes John Alker - because energy is too cheap to really matter. But with 90% of operating costs spent on staff, show that green building design makes employees happier and more productive, and you're really onto something ... more...

The UN saved the ozone layer - now it's the climate's turn

Nigel Paul

23rd September 2014

We did it for the ozone layer. Noe it's the climate's turn. Photo: ozone conditions over Antarctica, 7th September 2014. NASA. Thirty years after the UN took action to save the ozone layer, we can count the benefits - which only begin with 2 million fewer cases of skin cancer a year, writes Nigel Paul. With world leaders taking on the much greater climate challenge today, we should take cheer, and inspiration, from that historic success. more...

Saving Brazil's Atlantic forest on a shoe string

Cristina Banks-Leite

18th September 2014

'Mata Atlântica' in Brazil's Serra da Gandarela national park. But there are few large forest areas like this one remaining. Mostly the Atlantic forest habitat is fragmented by farms, roads and towns. Photo: Frederico Pereira via Flickr. As Brazil prepares for elections next month, conserving its remaining Atlantic Forest is a hot issue, writes Cristina Banks-Leite. Ecologists want to preserve more native habitat, while farmers want to expand their acreage. But there is one solution that ought to please everyone. more...

Abounding life! 4,000 microbes thrive in Antarctic lake beneath the ice

Helen Thompson

15th September 2014

The view down the borehole through half a mile of the Antarctic ice to Lake Whillans. Photo: Reed Scherer / Northern Illinois University. Beneath half a mile of ice scientists have uncovered the first hard evidence of a life in a subglacial lake, writes Helen Thompson. And not just life, but a complex ecosystem comprising thousands of microbial species. Could Jupiter's frozen moon Europa be hiding lakes like this? more...

How will the new EU team line up on GMOs, TTIP and energy?

Lawrence Woodward

11th September 2014

Jean-Claude Juncker in a moment of satisfaction following his election by the European Parliament as President of the Commission. But now, will his Commissioners implement his vision? Photo: European Parliament. We have a new European Commission - so what does it mean for the environment, GMOs and trade negotiations? Lawrence Woodward can't help feeling that the best part of the package is Commission President Juncker himself. Now, will his 'team' pull together and work to deliver his vision? We can't quite count on it. more...

China and Mongolia clash over how to exploit the Gobi desert

Troy Sternberg

9th September 2014

Camels in the Gurvan Saikhan national park, Gobi desert, Mongolia. Photo: Stephane L via Flickr. Mongolia and China are separated by world views as well as by a border across the Gobi desert, writes Troy Sternberg. In Mongolia the idea that nature has intrinsic value is readily accepted, while China is more interested in resources for trade, industry and profit. Can a clash of interests be avoided? more...

Only connect - a renewable energy future for small island states

Zaheer Allam

5th September 2014

Male, Maldives, October 2010: President Nasheed installs solar panels on the Presidential Residence in 2010 - 18 months before the coup which brought his term of office to an end. The future of small island states has to be renewable, says Zaheer Allam. But that's only the first of many choices. It's just as important to develop energy networks that are diverse, resilient, adaptive and flexible - and avoid the centralised, unimodal models that investors and bureaucrats prefer to impose, often at huge long term cost. more...

Steel and concrete, give over to the new kid - bamboo

Dirk Hebel

4th September 2014

A forest of giant bamboo near Kyoto, Japan. Photo: Trey Ratcliff via Flickr. The global construction industry is dominated by steel and concrete, writes Dirk Hebel - but it doesn't have to be that way. There's a strong, fast-growing, climate-friendly, sustainable material ready and waiting. Bamboo could be the basis of a whole new 'green' building industry, that also provides abundant rural livelihoods. more...

The battle for Mosul Dam: a new age of water wars beckons

Jonathan Bridge

2nd September 2014

The Mosul dam spillway. Photo: United States Army Corps of Engineers / Wikimedia Commons. Conflict continues to rage in Iraq over control of the Mosul dam, which impounds 11 cubic kilometres of water and controls water levels and supplies across the country, writes Jonathan Bridge. It's not the first battle fought over control of water - and it's certainly not the last in a drying Middle East with fast-growing populations. more...

Over-burning could be damaging Australia's wildlife for 100 years

Dale Nimmo, Andrew Bennett & Michael Clarke

29th August 2014

Western pygmy possums use tree hollows that take decades to develop in mallee ecosystems. Photo: Lauren Brown. We know that Australia's dry bush has co-evolved with fire, so that means regular planned burning is a good thing? Up to a point ... some increasingly rare species depend on 'old growth' bush up to 100 years old, and over-frequent burning is putting them under long-term threat. more...

Confronting the threat of invasive 'ecosystem engineers'

Jodey Peyton & Helen Roy

26th August 2014

The Asian hornet is a voracious predator of bees - as if they were not suffering enough already! Photo:  Danel Solabarrieta, CC BY-SA. Mussels, crabs, hornets and ... racoons? Future invasive species are not what you might expect, write Jodey Peyton & Helen Roy. In particular, we have to beware of 'ecosystem engineers' that can transform the environment they inhabit, creating ecological havoc for other species.
more...

More calories from fewer sources means less nutrition, more profit

David Nally

21st August 2014

A vast monoculture of corn in Iowa, USA - profitable, but not healthy. Photo: Rich Griffith via Flickr. It's a global phenomenon - we are consuming more calories, and more of those calories are the same, writes David Nally. Just ten crops produce 75% of our food, as factory-farmed meat, sugar, wheat, corn, soybeans and palm oil displace more nutritious and diverse diets. It's not good for us, or the planet - but it's great for corporate food monopolists! more...

Ignoring Ukraine's neo-Nazi storm troopers

Robert Parry

14th August 2014

The Wolfsangel symbol of Adolf Hitler’s SS on a banner in Ukraine. Western media have studiously ignored the far-right, violent and often outright Nazi politics of many of Ukraine's Euro-Maidan protestors, writes Robert Parry. But with the thugs now organized into Nazi brigades of the Ukrainian army, and waging war on Russian separatists, an unlikely British paper has dared tell the truth: the conservative Daily Telegraph. more...

Our uplands: a burning desire for action

Martin Harper

12th August 2014

Walshaw Moor, near Hebden Bridge, after burning to improve grouse yields. Photo: energyroyd.org.uk/ . Today, on the 'Glorious 12th', well-heeled folk take to the hills to shoot grouse. And to be sure there's lots of birds to kill, writes Martin Harper, England's moorlands are burnt with dire impacts on their biodiversity and ability to absorb rainfall. It's high time to end this barbaric practice! more...

Hug a tree, save your life

Pat Thomas

9th August 2014

Yes I'm a full blown tree hugger now! Photo: John Mosbaugh via Flickr. Trees in cities make us feel happier and more relaxed, writes Pat Thomas, but that's only the beginning of the benefits they confer. They also reduce air pollution, levels of asthma and other respiratory problems, and lower healthcare costs by $7 billion in the US alone. more...

America's wild mustangs cannot be left to manage themselves

J. Edward de Steiguer

7th August 2014

Wild mustangs are a powerful symbol of American freedom - but they cannot be left to reproduce indefinitely. Photo: Carol Walker, Author provided. Wild mustangs are a potent symbol of pioneer spirit in the old West, writes J. Edward de Steiguer. But with few natural controls on their numbers, the population of almost 100,000 is rising by 20% a year. Now it's up to humans to control their numbers - one way or another. more...

Microplastic ocean pollution - will you join our research voyage?

Kate Rawles

5th August 2014

Fishing for plastic in the open ocean on the Rozalia in the 2013 Gaia to Gyre expedition. Photo: Ceri Lewis via Flickr. Plastic pollution in the oceans is impacting every level of marine life, writes Kate Rawles, from micro-plankton to whales. And here is your chance to do something about it - join a research expedition to the Azores next month to study the problem and develop solutions! more...

Lead pollution beat Amundsen and Scott to the South Pole - and it's still pouring down today

Joe McConnell

2nd August 2014

Even in the 19th century, lead from Broken Hill smelters was polluting Antarctica. NSW Records Office, CC BY. Ice core analysis shows that lead pollution in Antarctica took off in the 1880s as mining at Broken Hill, Australia, took off. Lead residues have fallen from their late 20th century peak, writes Joe McConnell - but they are still four times higher than in pre-industrial times. more...

Reaping the benefits of community energy

Emily Haves

31st July 2014

A solar-powered thatch hut. Photo: Ashden. Donors, NGOs and investors want to help grassroots sustainable energy enterprises grow, so they can bring the myriad benefits of clean and affordable energy to many more people, writes Emily Haves. But just what kind of support is needed? more...

Why freshwater dolphins are among the world’s most endangered mammals

Rachel Nuwer

30th July 2014

An Irawaddy dolphin slips beneath the surface of the Mekong river at Kampie, Cambodia. Photo: Jim Davidson via Flickr Humans are to blame for the drastic declines in river dolphin populations around the world, writes Rachel Nuwer. But what exactly are we doing wrong? Mainly, scientists have found, it's building dams - and so destroying and fragmenting their habitat. more...

Closing the money loop to build resilient local economies

Bran Knowles & Michael Hallam

21st July 2014

Local currencies, like these Totnes and Stroud 'pounds' are intended to stimulate local economic resilience and keep benefits within communities. But is there a better way to achieve the same ends, everywhere? Photo: London Permaculture via Flickr. Using local currencies to stimulate local economies and revalue local labour over imported products and resources sounds like a great idea - but recent experiences have proved disappointing. Are there other ways to 'close the money loop'? more...

To keep cyclists safe will need deep, radical change

Ian Walker

19th July 2014

It's all very well painting cycle lanes onto roads - but we must do far, far more than that to make cycling a safe and pleasant transport option. Photo: Cian Ginty via Flickr. The Commons Transport Committee has advised Government to budget £10 per head to create a safe cycling environment, writes Ian Walker. But that's grossly underestimating the challenge ahead - a major rethink of planning, health and transport policies is needed. more...

Great snakes! Football fans, explore at your peril

Natasha Geiling

15th July 2014

Some 90 miles off the Sao Paulo coast, Ilha da Queimada Grande looks very pretty from far away. But up close, it's terrifying. Photo: Prefeitura Municipal Itanhaém. Brazil's Ilha de Queimada Grande is the only home of one of the world's deadliest, and most endangered, snakes, writes Natasha Geiling. Just the place for Brazil's disgraced football team to escape the wrath of furious fans, if they can only get a permit ... more...

Why do the local people protect the elephants?

Susan Canney

14h July 2014

Mali elephants by Carlton Ward Jr.  / carltonward.com. Mali's elephants have lived for millennia in the inhospitable Sahara, writes Susan Canney. But with their survival at risk from a host of modern, 21st century threats, local people are coming together to protect them - and finding that they too are benefiting. more...

Whalers' log books confirm - Arctic sea ice is retreating

Tim Radford

9th July 2014

Oil painting by John Wood (1798-1849) of British whalers circa 1840. Photo: Lee and Juliet Fulger Fund  / Wikimedia Commons. Log books from British whaling ships more than 200 years ago have given new insights into the history of the Arctic sea ice, reports Tim Radford. A new study reveals that the scale of ice melt in the Arctic over the last few decades is new and unprecedented. more...

Red wolf extinction fear as US budget cuts bite

Joseph Hinton

7th July 2014

Red wolves are clinging on to existence in a few thousand kilometres of the southeastern US. Photo: B. Bartel / USFWS, CC BY-SA The US Fish and Wildlife Service has done pioneering conservation work to save North America's endangered Red Wolf, under threat from shooting and inter-breeding with coyotes. But now federal budget cuts are putting all that - and the Red wolf itself - at risk. more...

Soaking the customer - Thames Water's £4 billion sewage money grab

John Allen & Michael Pryke

4th July 2014

If this water was money ... Photo: loopzilla / CC BY-SA. Using sophisticated financial engineering, Thames Water is making its customers pay almost the whole cost of its £4.2 billion London sewage tunnel. Is it time England ditched corporate ownership of its utilities and adopted Wales's 'non-profit' model? more...

Our garbage is polluting the remotest, deepest ocean

Sarah Zielinski

1st July 2014

Surveys off the coast of Europe revealed all kinds of human trash, including plastic bags (upper left and lower right), beer cans (lower left) and glass bottles (upper right). Photo: Pham et al. Even creatures at the bottom of the ocean aren't sheltered from the detritus of human civilization, writes Sarah Zielinski. Everywhere they have looked, scientists have found plastic, glass and other trash littering the seafloor and collecting in canyons. more...

Ecover is as green as ever!

Tom Domen & Dirk Develter

25th June 2014

the 'green wall' that Ecover has planned for its new offices will feature adjustable lattices to take advantage of low latitude sun for space heating, while reflecting off surplus summer heat. Image: Ecover. Ecover refutes allegations that it has been using 'synthetic biology' to make soap ingredients from algae. On the contrary, write Tom Domen & Dirk Develter, it's just old fashioned fermentation, and the company remains at the forefront of sustainability and responsible practice. more...

The amazing emotional intelligence of our primate cousins

Danielle Radin

24th June 2014

Gorilla, Philadelphia Zoo. Photo: Richard Ricciardi via Flickr. Gorillas cooperating to dismantle poachers's snares, altruistic, food sharing chimpanzees, grieving lemurs performing death rituals ... Danielle Radin finds an extraordinary emotional depth and capacity for empathy in our fellow primates. more...

Brazilians have far more to protest about than the World Cup

Steffen Böhm & Rafael Kruter Flores

20th June 2014

The Belo Monte dam construction site. Photo: Programa de Aceleração do Crescimento via Flickr. It may all be over for England, but for Brazil, the battle is only just beginning. Anger over the vast cost of the World Cup - well over $10 billion - and its huge social impacts, is spilling over into a wider fury at massive mega-projects than enrich elites, trash the environment, and leave the poor poorer. more...

The Tambora eruption and human history

Gillen D'Arcy Wood

18th June 2014

The huge caldera of Mount Tambora, Indonesia - still active today. Photo: Jialiang Gao, CC BY-SA. The greatest volcanic eruption in human history changed the 19th century as much as Napoleon, if not more, writes Gillen D'Arcy Wood. Yet how many of us know of Tambora, the climate havoc it unleashed, or the global cholera pandemic it spawned? more...

PNG: 'Lost' bat species rediscovered after 120 years in the wilderness

Luke Leung, Julie Broken-Brow & Catherine Hughes

15th June 2014

Back after going missing for more than a century: the New Guinea big-eared bat. Photo: Julie Broken-Brow. A 'microbat' that has remained unrecorded since 1890 has been discovered in Papua New Guinea. But with the country's forests under growing pressure from logging and for conversion to plantations, this and thousands of other biological treasures are at risk. more...

Dan Box - The Carteret Islands

Dan Box Blog - Paradise lost

Dan Box

14th May, 2009

DANBOX_Arrivals.jpg Dan Box reports from a community in its death throes, as the Carteret islanders pack up their homes and prepare to become the world’s first climate change refugees more...

Dan Box Blog: Morning in Tinputz

Dan Box

29th April, 2009

I slept in my clothes last night, on the bare wooden floor of one of the houses the first boatload of people to be evacuated from the Carteret Islands are building for their families. It was a jet-black night in the small clearing hacked out amid the jungle, the dark broken only by our two candles and the lights of Fireflies jigging in the trees. more...

The Evacuation Begins

Dan Box

22nd April, 2009

first arrivals at Tinputz.jpg Dan Box is on-site to witness the world's first climate refugees being evacuated due to rising sea levels more...

Other Blogs

Independent living in Canada

February 14th, 2013

by Eagle Gamma

Eagle Gamma profiles an ethnographer who chose life off-the-grid, and found true independence..... more...

Indonesia's Sumatran tiger threatened by development of last jungle strongholds

Dr. Julian Bloomer

4th September, 2012

Sumatran tiger As politicians encourage development around the Kerinci Seblat National Park, Dr. Julian Bloomer explores how the area's endangered species can be protected more...

Creating the future: How 'Zero Carbon Britain' is inspiring positivity in today's artists

Paul Allen

16th August, 2012

Zero Carbon Britain 2030 The Centre for Alternative Technology's Emergence Summit must develop positive versions of the future, as if we can't imagine it - there won't be one, says Paul Allen more...

Ewan Kingston

I did London to Sydney without flying. Here's how

Ewan Kingston

16th April, 2010

Ewan in front of a coach Our well-grounded Kiwi reflects on his six month (almost flightless) odyssey from London to New Zealand, and answers all the usual questions on travel without wings more...

I failed. I caught a plane

Ewan Kingston

3rd February, 2010

A plane ready for boarding Thousands of miles by train, coach, bus, boat and foot and, at the last hurdle, Ewan finds that there's no way to cross the Tasman Sea except on metal wings... more...

Bali to Australia by catamaran

Ewan Kingston

18th December, 2009

View from catamaran Though it was slow, choppy, wet and tiring, Ewan looks back on his wind-powered crossing to Australia as an experience worth every minute more...

Jeremy Smith

Inspiring solutions are out there, you just have to look

Jeremy Smith

25th October, 2009

Jeremy Blog image The 350.org events last Saturday on the International Day of Climate Action give us cause for hope. As Jeremy Smith is discovering, there are thousands of inspiring stories out there about people making a difference more...

It's ecotourism, but not as we know it

Jeremy Smith

5th October, 2009

Jeremy Blog image Ecotourism is not simply about minimising your negative impact. There are places you can go where your presence (and money) can make a positive difference too
more...

Ivili - new video website for sharing green tech ideas

Jeremy Smith

14th September, 2009

Jeremy Blog image There are plenty of small scale, locally appropriate innovations out there. Jeremy Smith has set up a video archive and social network that puts all the stories and advice together
more...

Gaian Economics

A green tax? James Tobin would be spinning in his grave

Gaian Economics

3rd September, 2009

Gaian Economics Lord Adair Turner - head of the FSA and the Climate Change Committe - has ruffled feathers by suggesting a tax on currency trading. Here's why more...

When it comes to work, less is more

Gaian Economics

18th August, 2009

Gaian Economics Why don't we follow the French model and take the whole month of August as holiday? It may help strengthen our economy more...

Mr. Bean to explain quantitative easing policy

Molly Scott Cato

16th July, 2009

Gaian Economics The deputy-director of the Bank of England is on a national tour to convince us of the seriousness of its policies to ease the recession. Molly Scott Cato can't wait for the punchline more...

Transition Culture

Five amazing things you never knew about potatoes

Transition Culture

6th July, 2009

Transition Culture Inspired by digging up some home grown new potatoes on a July afternoon Rob Hopkins is running a special competition - to win one of his potatoes... more...

Song lyrics for a better world

Transition Culture

29th June, 2009

Transition Culture In their new song 'Inaugural Trams', the Super Furry Animals capture a moment from a post carbon future more...

Transition meets local government

Transition Culture

24th June, 2009

Transition Culture What can happen when a Transition Initiative and its local authority work together: the Stroud story more...

Jonathon Porritt

Sarkozy deserves applause for his stance on growth

Jonathon Porritt

23rd September, 2009

Jonathon Porritt Few people in policy work have nice things to say about the Treasury, especially if you produce reports challenging economic growth. So Sarkozy's recent move on GDP is welcome more...

Have NGOs sold out?

Jonathon Porritt

13th July 2009

Jonathon Porritt Accusations that NGOs have got far too cosy with big business have been around for years. But where does the blame really lie? more...

Ecologist Leader

Recessions are unsustainable, but they sure cut emissions

Mark Anslow

30th March, 2010

editor's blog The dramatic cuts in UK emissions suggested by the Government's preliminary figures are staggering - but we would be wrong to celebrate them more...

Copenhagen: concession and compromise

Mark Anslow

18th December, 2009

cop15 Climate negotiations are always a balancing act. But the global atmosphere is not a politician, and it won't forgive us if we get this wrong more...

Shame on the 'climategate' scientists

Mark Anslow

27th November, 2009

Ecologist Editor Mark Anslow explores the fallout from the leaked email exchanges between climate scientists more...

Environmental Law Foundation

Corby judgment: do birth defects mean nothing?

Debbie Tripley

21st August, 2009

A handful of brave, convinced mothers fought their local council to make it pay for polluting their environment and causing their children birth defects. But has anyone learned anything from this landmark ruling? more...

Atlantic Rising

Atlantic Rising: creating a fashion for guilt-free fur

Lynn Morris

11th October, 2010

fur fashion on sale Can fashion fur be guilt free? A project in Louisiana believes the answer is yes - if you are wearing swamp rat more...

Atlantic Rising: Living on the edge on Nantucket Island in the US

Lynn Morris

28th September, 2010

Coastal erosion Homes are being moved and maps redrawn as coastal erosion eats away at an island off Massachusetts
more...

Atlantic Rising: sea level rise threatens the Orinoco Delta in Venezuela

Will Lorimer

1st September, 2010

Venezuela Rising sea levels are forcing the migration of indigenous peoples and threatening the freshwater ecosystem of catfish and piranha found in the Orinoco Delta near the coast of Venezuela more...

Greening my office

Greening my office: choosing an ethical pension

Sylvia Sunshine

13th January, 2011

Sylvia takes a step towards financial security with her premier pension payment. But can she keep a clean conscience at the same time? more...

Greening my office: can't we all just go camping instead of jetting off overseas?

Sylvia Sunshine

17th August, 2010

As her colleagues jet off to sunnier climes, Sylvia tackles the thorny issue of eco holidays - but will she pluck up the courage to confront her boss over his second home? more...

Greening my office: I got them to switch the heating off!

Sylvia Sunshine

9th July, 2010

thermostat Sylvia scores her first eco success - persuading her sceptical boss that heating an unoccupied portion of the office is a terrible waste of resources more...

Laura Laker

Life without supermarkets: community action is the best way to beat them

Laura Laker

10th August, 2010

Community garden A hypermarket victory in Hackney demonstrates how local groups can help protect community shops... more...

Life without supermarkets: forget posh organic shops; check out food co-ops

Laura Laker

13th July, 2010

Money To keep prices down, Laura shops around and gives food co-ops a whirl... more...

Life without supermarkets: escaping choice overload

Laura Laker

14th June, 2010

food co-ops Laura Laker discovers the joys of farmers' markets, the convenience of vegboxes, and the horror of plans for a nearby Tesco Metro that will threaten her local corner shop more...

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