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wildlife conservation: 1/25 of 47
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How's it worth more? Alive or dead? African bush elephant. Photo: Arno Meintjes via Fliuckr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Saving the elephant: don't forget local communities!

Ross Harvey & Alexander Rhodes

10th October 2016

With 27,000 African savannah elephants a year illegally killed for their ivory, the species is in peril, write Ross Harvey & Alexander Rhodes. Now international action at CITES and the closure of domestic ivory markets are attacking the ivory trade at both ends. But we must also give our full support to 'elephant neighbor' communities. more...

The Ecologist Arts Interview: UK Wildlife Artist Rachel Lockwood

Gary Cook

28th September, 2016

Wildlife artist Rachel Lockwood is in creative lockdown preparing for her new exhibition called Wilding. Ecologist Arts Editor, GARY COOK went to her North Norfolk studio to talk paint, animals and other environmental matters more...
Could a legal, regulated trade in rhino horn help save these wonderful animals by paying for their conservation and taking the profit out of poaching? Photo: rhino on the Eastern Cape, South Africa, by Colin via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

To save our rhinos, we need a legal horn trade

Keith Somerville, University of Kent

22nd September 2016

The trade ban on rhino horn is not working, writes Keith Somerville. But non-lethally and sustainably harvested rhino horn can earn income to encourage breeders, pay rangers and anti-poaching teams, provide surveillance and supply wider benefits that will gain the support of people around parks, reserves and ranches. more...
Who ate all the pies? Robin redbreast on an English farm. Photo: John Bennett via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

'State of Nature' 2016 report shows continued loss of Britain's biodiversity

Susan Clark

14th September 2016

The 2016 'State of Nature' report, published today, offers many small victories to celebrate, writes SUSAN CLARK, but overall it's not good news: 15% of our native species are under threat of extinction, while 53% are in decline. With intensive farming the main cause of the damage, and climate change a serious long term problem, turning the tide of wildlife attrition will be a long and challenging task. more...
Durham Wildlife Trust volunteers surveying invertebrate populations at Stanley Moss, Sunniside, England. Photo: Dougie Nisbet via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

'State of Nature': a labour of love by Britain's conservation heroes

Dr Mark Eaton

14th September 2016

The 'State of Nature' report, published today, is the apex of a vast pyramid of loving and heroic toil by many thousands of volunteer naturalists, writes Dr Mark Eaton - hard at work in all seasons in our marshes, forests, mountains, swamps and farmland. But do we have the young recruits to keep this wonderful tradition going? more...

New Whale Heritage Sites (WHS) signal a new era in responsible whale watching

DYLAN WALKER

16th August, 2016



As whale watching grows in popularity, so too do concerns about marine habitats and the conservation of whales, dolphins and porpoises. DYLAN WALKER of the World Cetacean Alliance explains why we must all take responsibility for ethical interactions with these intriguing animals
more...

Reward Offered to help catch and convict wolf pup poachers

22nd June, 2016

The Center for Biological Diversity has launched a new Wolf Defense Fun to help protect wolves in the wild more...

Footprint Identification Technology - where traditional ecology meets technology

Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai of WildTrack

26th May 2016

The inspiration for the pioneering Footprint Identification Technique (FIT) technology sprang from an unexpected source - traditional ecological wisdom. Conservationists Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai explain how that happened. more...

Footprint Identification Technology (FIT) - where traditional ecology meets technology

Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai

25th May, 2016

The inspiration for Footprint Identification Technology (FIT) sprang from an unexpected source - traditional ecological know how. Conservationists Zoe Jewell & Sky Alibhai explain how that happened more...
This Baka boy, and his community, hunt only for their own subsistence. But they are criminalised by the 'fortress conservation' promoted by 'Last Days of Ivory'. Photo: Seclen Kucukustel / Atlas.

'Last Days of Ivory' promotes a military conservation that is fatal for tribal peoples

Lewis Evans

17th November 2015

The massacre of elephants for Asian ivory trade is driving the iconic African giant to extinction, writes Lewis Evans. But the 'military response' is both brutal and ineffective, all the more so as it excludes and alienates the indigenous communities who are the best defenders of nature and wildlife. The simplistic message of 'Last Days of Ivory' is both damaging and dangerous. more...

Killer cuteness: how YouTube sent an endangered species to the brink of extinction

Professor Anna Nekaris

14th November 2013

There is nothing endearing about the truth behind the 'cute' YouTube videos of Slow Loris, a critically endangered species. Still, video clips of species of conservation concern may have a positive flip side ... more...

Frontline Online: Conservation’s New Winners & Losers

March 19th, 2013

by Lorna Howarth

The CITES COP16 (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna) has just ended in Bangkok, to very mixed reviews. Lorna Howarth reports on the good news, and the bad. more...

wildlife conservation: 1/25 of 47
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Sumatran tiger

Indonesia's Sumatran tiger threatened by development of last jungle strongholds

Dr. Julian Bloomer

4th September, 2012

As politicians encourage development around the Kerinci Seblat National Park, Dr. Julian Bloomer explores how the area's endangered species can be protected more...
Gorilla

Congo’s rangers locate first mountain gorilla families in rebel-held territory

The Ecologist

7th August, 2012

Rangers have detected gorilla families in Virunga National Park for the first time since fighting broke out between M23 rebels and government forces earlier this year more...
The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World’s Wild Places

The Great Animal Orchestra: Finding the Origins of Music in the World's Wild Places

Laurie Tuffrey

5th April, 2012

Bernie Krause has spent a lifetime recording the sonics of nature. But, as Laurie Tuffrey finds, his quest to record the elusive sound of the wild finds practical application in conservation more...
unesco

The Ecologist meets… UNESCO's Kishore Rao

Ruth Styles

15th March, 2012

Can the planet’s cultural and natural heritage be protected during a war? Ruth Styles talks Syria, conservation and natural wonders with Kishore Rao, head of the UNESCO World Heritage Centre more...
sable antelope

Sable shenanigans: how Zambia’s sable population is falling prey to unscrupulous traders

Ian Michler

15th February, 2012

In Zambia’s newest national park live more than 200 sable antelope. Coralled in conditions that are far from ideal, the animals have languished there for almost three years; the victims of bureaucracy, unscrupulous operators and a disregard for conservation. Ian Michler reports more...
Steve Trent

WildAid: How to end the illegal wildlife trade

Matilda Lee

1st December, 2011

WildAid's Steve Trent on why only robust anti-poaching operations, undercover investigations and high profile prosecutions can save the remaining wild rhinos, elephants, tigers and sharks more...
Wilderness

The human face of conservation: bringing community and wildlife together

Ruth Styles

1st December, 2011

Across Africa, the traditional idea of safari parks is getting an overhaul - and where once locals were excluded, models with community involvement are finding long-term success more...
Javan Rhino

Can Asia’s large mammals be saved from extinction?

A. Christy Williams

28th October, 2011

The Javan rhino isn’t the only south east Asian mammal whose future looks bleak, says the WWF’s A. Christy Williams more...
voluntourism

Ten of the best... British volunteering holidays

Christine Ottery

21st October, 2011

Volunteering holidays aren't just for bored teenagers. As Christine Ottery found out, there are plenty of ways to see the UK and do your bit at the same time more...
Species on the Edge of Survival

Species on the Edge of Survival

Ruth Styles

1st August, 2011

Based on the IUCN’s Red List, Species on the Edge of Survival is a glossy tome with an important raison d’etre – to raise awareness of the plants, birds and animals we stand to lose forever, says Ruth Styles more...
Tiger

PHOTO GALLERY: Species on the Edge of Survival

Ruth Styles

1st September, 2011

From the tiger to the bumblebee, the list of endangered birds, animals and insects is a growing one. Now a new book based on the IUCN Red List is providing an insight into the species under threat more...
A langur monkey

Why the BBC is wrong to scrap its Wildlife Fund

Rob St John

3rd August, 2011

The planned closure of the BBC Wildlife Fund represents the premature end of a model for how wildlife film-making can support conservation of the very environments it documents, says Rob St John more...
Dr. Wallace J. Nichols

Dr. Wallace J. Nichols: conservation travel can help save endangered wildlife

Deborah Bassett

29th June, 2011

Marine biologist, lecturer, ocean ambassador and founder of several conservation initiatives, Dr. Wallace J. Nichols speaks to Deborah Bassett about the benefits of wildlife tourism, saving baby turtle eggs and an 112 day trek along the US west coast more...

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