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Nuclear power: 1/25 of 102
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Diablo Canyon in California lies in a seismically active zone totally unsuitable for a nuclear power plant. Photo: Nuclear Regulatory Commission via Flickr.

Earthquake risk makes California's Diablo Canyon a Fukushima in waiting

Karl Grossman

27th August 2014

A newly-exposed report by Diablo Canyon's lead nuclear inspector shows that the twin reactors are unsafe, writes Karl Grossman. An earthquake on nearby geological faults could trigger a Fukushima-scale accident causing 10,000 early fatalities. The owner's response? Apply to extend the site's operation for another 20 years. more...
The Vale of Mordor - or is the Sellafield 'atom factory' in Cumbria, UK? Photo: tim_d via Flickr.

Bombs Ahoy! Why the UK is desperate for nuclear power

Oliver Tickell

26th August 2014

On the face of it, the UK government's obsession with nuclear power defies reason. It's very expensive, inflexible, creates 'existential' threats and imposes enormous 'long tail' liabilities tens of thousands of years into the future. But there is a simple explanation: it's all to maintain the UK's status as a nuclear WMD state. more...
Scheduled for completion in 2009, the Olkiluoto-3 nuclear plant is still under construction, and Areva is no longer projecting a completion date. Costs are running at roughly triple initial estimates. Photo: BBC World Service via Flickr.

The nuclear industry today: declining, but not (yet) dying

Jonathon Porritt

25th August 2014

The World Nuclear Industry Status Report provides an account of an industry in decline, writes Jonathon Porritt - with rising operating costs and an ever-shrinking share of world energy production, while the sector loses the race for investment and new generating capacity to fast growing renewable energy technologies. more...
The Dounreay nuclear plant in Caithness, Scotland, is one of those that have provoked an increase in childhood leukemia. Photo: Paul Wordingham via Flickr.

Nuclear power stations cause childhood leukemia - and here's the proof

Ian Fairlie

23rd August 2014

Controversy has been raging for decades over the link between nuclear power stations and childhood leukemia. But as with tobacco and lung cancer, it's all about hiding the truth, writes Ian Fairlie. Combining data from four countries shows, with high statistical significance, that radioactive releases from nuclear plants are the cause of the excess leukemia cases. more...
Sign for the Inkay uranium mining operation in southern Kazakhstan. Photo: Mheidegger via Wikimedia Commons.

Kazakhstan's nuclear power plans - the mysteries only deepen

Komila Nabiyeva

19th August 2014

Russia has announced that it will build the first thermal nuclear power station in Kazakhstan, the world's largest uranium producer, writes Komila Nabiyeva. But where in that vast country will it be located? Who will own and operate it? How many reactors are planned? Who will get the power? And will it ever actually happen? more...
Rosetta approaching its destination after a 6 billion km journey. Image: ESA.

Rosetta shows - we can keep space plutonium-free!

Karl Grossman

5th August 2014

Deep space missions have previously run on nuclear power, writes Karl Grossman - and have twice showered Earth with radioactive debris. But the ESA's Rosetta probe, about to reach its destination, is 100% solar-powered - showing that space can be nuclear-free. more...
IAEA Experts at Unit 4 of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, 17th April 2013, as part of a mission to review Japan's plans to decommission the facility. Photo: IAEA Imagebank.

Fukushima - we need health studies now!

Joseph Mangano & Janette Sherman

2nd August 2014

A massive health crisis is following the 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, write Joseph Mangano & Janette Sherman - not just in Japan but around the world. But the health impacts remains woefully under-studied. Scientists must wake up and undertake serious research without delay. more...
Mirror, mirror, on the wall ... Solar panels near Dukovany nuclear power station, Czech Republic. Photo: Jiří Sedláček (Frettie) via Wikimedia Commons.

Nuclear industry prepares for global boom - or is that doom?

Paul Brown

2nd August 2014

The nuclear industry remains remarkably optimistic about its future, wrties Paul Brown - despite evidence that it is a shrinking source of power as renewables, in particular solar and wind power, compete with increasing success to fill the energy gap. more...
Tatyana Novikova (centre) at Aarhus, Denmark in a delegation from environmental NGO Ecohome to demand access to information about the Ostrovets nuclear power station under the Aarhus Convention. Photo: Ecohome.

Belarus - fighting nuclear power in the shadow of Chernobyl

Chris Garrard

28th July 2014

Tatyana Novikova has been fighting an unsafe nuclear power plant right on the country's border with Lithuania. She spoke to Chris Garrard about her campaign, the official persecution of anti-nuclear activists, and her invocation of the Aarhus Convention to the anti-nuclear cause. more...
England needs Scotland's wind power to keep the lights on. Photo: wind farm at Ardrossan by Gordon Cowan via Flickr.

Government hostility to renewables and Scottish independence may put the lights out

Peter Strachan & Alex Russell

1st August 2014

As the UK's electricity supply margins drop to new lows, the government's punitive approach to renewables will only make matters worse, write Peter Strachan & Alex Russell. Likewise its threats to boycott Scotland's wind power is utterly irrational - we will need it to keep our lights on. more...
Narsaq inlet - just the place for a uranium ore  port? Or a yellowcake plant? Photo: Claire Rowland via Flickr.

Australian uranium mining in Greenland is tearing the country in half

Antony Loewenstein

16th May 2014

Last October Greenland repealed a law that banned uranium mining. Now mysterious Australian mining companies are staking out the country for exploitation. But as Antony Loewenstein reports, local fears are growing, and political opposition is heating up. more...
The mushroom cloud above Nagasaki, 9th August 1945. The 'Fat Man' bomb contained just 6.2kg of plutonium 239 and delivered a 21 kt blast. Photo: Charles Levy / Wikimedia Commons.

Nuclear power undermines nuclear security

Dr David Lowry

2nd May 2014

Opponents of nuclear power rightly focus on issues of cost, operational danger and waste disposal, writes David Lowry. But they should not forget the towering 'elephant in the room' - nuclear security and the risk of proliferation and terrorist attacks. more...

Nuclear power: 1/25 of 102
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George Monbiot attempts to terrify his TED audience into loving nuclear power at TEDGlobal 2013 in Edinburgh, Scotland. June 12-15, 2013. Photo: TED Conference / James Duncan Davidson via Flickr.com.

'Arrest Monbiot' for 'nuclear crimes' - £100 reward

The Ecologist

26th April 2014

Marking 'Chernobyl day' 2014, a website is launched that calls for the arrest of writer George Monbiot for 'Nuclear Crimes against Humanity and the Environment'. more...
Chernobyl Zone 75, Pripyat, Ukraine. Photo: kvitlauk via Flickr.com.

Chernobyl - the biting wind, the silent scream

Barys Piatrovich

26th April 2014

Barys Piatrovich recalls the tension of unknowing during the days that followed the Chernobyl disaster. Today, barely any of the evacuees are still alive. Dispersed throughout the country, they died alone and unnoticed, statistically insignificant. more...
Angels of nuclear death. Image: Abode of Chaos via Flickr.com.

Chernobyl - how many died?

Jim Green - Nuclear Monitor

26th April 2014

It was 28 years ago today that Reactor 4 at the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine ruptured and ignited, sending a massive plume of radiation across Europe. Jim Green assesses the scientific evidence for how many people died as a result of the catastrophe. more...
Hinkley Point. Photo: Crowcombe Al via Flickr.com.

New EU rules hammer UK's nuclear ambitions

The Ecologist

10th April 2014

The UK tried to make the EU relax its rules on State Aid to allow subsidies to nuclear power. Now we know - it failed. The chances that the Hinkley C power station will ever be built have fallen another notch. more...
In the Chernobyl / Pripyat Exclusion Zone, February 2008. Photo: Pedro Moura Pinheiro via Flickr.com.

When life becomes a shadow - after nuclear catastrophe

Robert Jacobs

8th April 2014

Those caught up in nuclear disasters suffer many times over, writes Robert Jacobs. Ill-health and early death aside, they are also cut off from their former communities, identities and family life, and the victims of social and medical discrimination. more...
This time, it's for real. Kit Carson Cowboy Annual, 1958, front cover. Photo: Steve Bowbrick via flickr.com.

Cowboy-Indian solidarity challenges the Keystone XL

Brian Ward for SCNCC

12th April 2014

The 'Cowboy Indian Alliance' heads to Washington this month to oppose the Keystone XL pipeline, Brian Ward reports on the rich history of collaborative resistance to destructive corporate power between ranchers and Native Americans. more...
Hinkley Point nuclear plant, viewed across the reedbeds from Steart. Quantock Hills in the background. Photo: Mark Robinson via Flickr.com.

Hinkley C - a nuclear subsidy too far

Paul Dorfman

8th April 2014

As the European Commission considers the £100 billion subsidy package the UK has offered EDF to build and operate Hinkley C nuclear power station, Paul Dorfman explains why the 'deal' is illegal, anti-renewables, and ruinous to energy users and tax payers. more...
'Prism Fun' by Kristian Mollenborg via Flickr.com.

Why we should support nuclear power

Stephen Tindale

8th April 2014

The UK should continue to use nuclear power, in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, writes Stephen Tindale. It should also test new nuclear technologies that can burn plutonium, such as the PRISM reactor, and develop molten salt reactors. more...
AWBR under construction at Lungmen, Taiwan, in 2009. Photo: NuclearBWR / Wikimedia Commons.

Nuclear power - the Hitachi ABWR is not Justified

Cllr Mark Hackett

4th April 2014

The UK Government is seeking to 'Justify' the Hitachi ABWR reactor type for new nuclear build at Wylfa and Oldbury. But as Mark Hackett reveals, the design is a dismal failure in Japan, costs more than alternatives, and brings serious health hazards. more...
Picture taken at the museum in Hiroshima. It shows the devastation of the A-Bomb dropped on 6 August 1945. Photo: M M via Flickr.com.

We are still fighting a slow nuclear war

Julio Godoy in Berlin

1st April 2014

Robert 'Bo' Jacobs was brought up under the shadow of nuclear war. A world expert on the cultural and social impacts of radiation, he lives and works in Hiroshima. Julio Godoy caught the chance of an interview ... and discovered that nuclear war is still going on today - in slow motion. more...
Unit 1 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Generating Station. Unit 2 experienced a partial core meltdown in 1979 - the worst civilian nuclear accident in United States history. Photo: Richard Owens via Flickr.com.

Three Mile Island - 35 years on

Linda Pentz Gunter

28th March 2014

Thirty-five years ago today the USA had its worst ever civilian nuclear accident with a reactor meltdown at Three Mile Island. Linda Pentz Gunter reports on the lies and cover ups about the true scale of the radiation release and its impacts on human health. more...
The radiotoxicity of nuclear waste from  uranium and thorium based fuels compared. Image: Nuclear Engineering International magazine.

Exposing the thorium myth

Jan Beránek

26th March 2014

Nuclear enthusiasts have been singing the praises of nuclear reactors that use thorium as their fuel instead of uranium. Jan Beránek analyses the claims - and finds that thorium is a mere distraction on the way to our renewable future. more...
A recent residential development in Germany with all-solar PV roofing. Soon the whole world will be doing this - and probably adding solar walls to the mix.

Goldman Sachs - the US's solar future

Michael Mariotte / GreenWorld

25th March 2014

According to Goldman Sachs US home-owners will find it's technically and economically viable to go off-grid by 2033, writes Michael Mariotte. The big losers will be fossil and nuclear power generators. more...

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