The Ecologist

 

ad: 1/25 of 876
next »

Fish trade 'hugely underestimates' global catches

Jack Alexander

20th October, 2017

New research has found major discrepancies in the reporting of fish stocks. JACK ALEXANDER reports on whether effective conservation attempts can ever be implemented without the ability to accurately track fish species in trade. more...

Lions, elephants and rhinoceros exported by the thousand legally by 'trophy' hunters

Laura Briggs

17th October, 2017

The African Wildlife Foundation has uncovered the figures behind the shocking numbers of 'trophy hunters' and the sanctioned trade in exporting dead and living animals out of the continent, reports LAURA BRIGGS more...

The disappearance of Santiago Maldonado in 'Benetton’s stolen lands'

Atus Mariqueo-Russell & Carole Concha Bell

1st October, 2017

Santiago Maldonado was last seen as he was being forcibly dragged away by military police in Argentina on 1st August. Today marks the two-month anniversary of his disappearance. The police and the security minister, Patricia Bullrich, both deny that they have detained him. ATUS MARIQUEO-RUSSELL and CAROLE CONCHA BELL report more...

The Fish

James Morris-Knight

29th September, 2017

Fiction for Friday: Through a fictional short story about the underwater inhabitant of a Canadian lake, JAMES MORRIS-KNIGHT explores the loss of tradition, crime and industry in North America. more...

Our obsolescent economy: modern capitalism and 'throwaway culture'

Steven Gorelick

26 September, 2017

We live in a throwaway society. Innovation in the tech industries mean ever more powerful products come to market. But the death of repair shops and a culture of reliance is not simply the result of shiny new things. Corporations, and capitalism itself, requires planned obsolesce, argues STEVEN GORELICK more...

Elinor Ostrom, her Nobel Prize, and her rules for ecologist radicals

Derek Wall

21st September, 2017

Elinor Ostrom was a pioneer in ecology, whose research challenged the fallacy of the 'tragedy of the commons' where the needs of one ruin what is shared by many. Here DEREK WALL celebrates the first - and only - woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize in Economics more...

Bovine tuberculosis testing - we really need to talk

Tom Langton

11th September, 2017

Are the shortcoming of existing cattle TB tests soon to be exposed by a simple, clever blood test that has been waiting in the wings? The development may shine light on practical compromises in the extended, failing fight against TB in England - at huge tax-payers expense. Biologist TOM LANGTON looks at a growing dilemma in the world of bovine TB cattle testing more...

Millions worldwide hit by unprecedented flooding as climate change becomes a deadly reality

Claire James

31st August, 2017

Floods in Sierra Leone. Floods in India. Floods in Nepal. Floods in Bangladesh. Officials now estimate 41 million people across India, Nepal and Bangladesh have been affected. And of course there have been floods in Houston, Texas. We knew climate change would bring more flooding, so is this what the future holds, asks CLAIRE JAMES more...

Digging yourself a hole: how Australia is keeping coal current

Mariah Sampson

30th August, 2017

The Adani-Carmichael Coal Mine is an enduring stain on Australia’s underdeveloped environmental policies, with new fraud cases and environmental assessment reports weighing the venture down. Australian environmentalist MARIAH SAMPSON takes a look at the current state of affairs surrounding the plans for the biggest open coal mine in the world. more...

Cumbria's Bovine TB problem - hidden for years but now in the news

Lesley Docksey

25th August, 2017

Slowly the incidence of bTB in Cumbria has increased without any real outcry from the agricultural lobby. Why then, at the beginning of this month (August), has all of this information suddenly become news asks LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Dealing with climate migration: 'what matters are our actions'

Arthur Wyns

21st August, 2017

Human induced climate change will have many effects on people’s homes, livelihoods and current way of living. But what happens with the millions that will be displaced? ARTHUR WYNS takes a look at Bangladesh, a low-lying country of delta’s marshes and Sundarbans that is at the forefront of dealing with climate migration. more...

Donald Trump ends IPCC funding and 'abandons global science leadership'

Brenda Ekwurzel

17th August, 2017

The US has ended its funding to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change despite the serious national security implications for the country, argues BRENDA EKWURZEL more...

ad: 1/25 of 876
next »

Cuadrilla 'takes risks' as fracking resistance rolls on

Lydia Noon

2nd August, 2017

What do Mr Blobby, Spiderman and Dumbledore have in common? And Bez from 80s rock band Happy Mondays, local residents, farmers, students and solidarity groups from around the UK? These characters assembled for a climate carnival in Lancashire, reports LYDIA NOON more...

Trump’s top trade nominees lobbied for hormone-meat exports

Lawrence Carter, EnergyDesk

July 31, 2017

The nature of Britain's trade deals with the United States after Brexit raises serious concerns about the quality of food on supermarket shelves - and the influence of vested interests in the meat industry, reports LAWRENCE CARTER of EnergyDesk, Greenpeace. more...

Spiritual Ecology: 10 Practices to Reawaken the Sacred in Everyday Life

Kara Moses

17th July, 2017

How does cleaning your kitchen help resolve the planetary crisis? Why does the manner in which you cook your dinner have implications for how you affect change in the world? Perhaps more than you think. KARA MOSES reviews Spiritual Ecology: 10 Practices to Reawaken the Sacred in Everyday Life more...

Climate change threatens centuries' old Indigenous cultures and traditions

Ayeen Karunungan, Climate Tracker

10 July, 2017

Climate change will have a devastating impact on millions of people, threatening housing and agriculture. But it carries a terrible cost in terms of culture and tradition too. The young journalists and photographers working with CLIMATE TRACKER hope to capture something of these cultures before they are lost for ever more...

Meadows offer food and shelter to vast varieties of animals and wildflowers - and must be saved

Laura Briggs

30 June 2017

The Save Our Magnificent Meadows partnership hopes to demonstrate the fragility and importance of our fast-disappearing Great British meadows. more...

Foxhounds and bovine TB edges (finally) into the news

Lesley Docksey

23rd June, 2017

The publication of research into foxhounds and bovine TB is being hidden behind a cover up, with an outbreak in one hunt's pack kept secret for three months before the news leaked out, writes LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Leading from Nature: Politics and Biomimicry

Elizabeth Wainwright, Nature Editor

13th June, 2017

As Theresa May and her Ministers struggle to make a pact with the DUP, Ecologist Nature Editor, ELIZABETH WAINWRIGHT says we could all do worse than model both leadership and politics on Nature and work together to improve partnership and community, as well as innovation more...

Australian Government and UNESCO are Oceans Apart on Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef

Maxine Newlands

12th June, 2017

Australia's governments and mining giant Adani have announced the go ahead for a mega mine - despite the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO) warnings over climate change and the likely impact on the Great Barrier Reef. MAXINE NEWLANDS reports more...
Ecuador's 'free trade' agreement with the US only undermined their ability to get justice for Texaco's toxic legacy of oil pollution, and did little to attract investment. Now it has been dumped along with 15 others. Photo of Lago Agrio by Caroline Bennet

Ecuador rips up 16 toxic trade treaties

Nick Dearden / Global Justice Now

31st May 2017

Ecuador is the latest country to tear up 'free trade' agreements that have so far cost the country $21 billion in damages awarded to foreign companies by 'corporate courts', and yielded next to nothing in return, writes Nick Dearden. So the outgoing President Correa did the only sensible thing: in one of his final executive acts this month, he scrapped 16 toxic trade and investment treaties. more...
Display from a BG smart meter. Just too bad about all the electromagnetic smog it generates. Photo: athriftymrs.com via Flickr (CC BY-SA).

Smart meter radiation and health - why are we neglecting non-toxic alternatives?

Lynne Wycherley

6th June 2017

With growing evidence of harm to physical and mental health caused by continuous pulsed em radiation from 'smart' electricity meters, Lynne Wycherley asks: have we underestimated risks to heart function and the nervous system? And of interference with embedded medical devices, such as cardiac pacemakers? It's time to switch to over-wire or fibre communications to bring the 'smart green grid' of the future to electrosmog-free reality. more...
Who needs research into climate change adaptation? Flooding in Brisbane, Queensland, 11th January 2011. Photo: Angus Veitch via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

Australia axes climate change adaptation research

Tayanah O'Donnel & Josephine Mummery, University of Canberra

16th May 2017

Natural disasters like flood and drought have cost the Australian government more than A$12 billion since 2009, write Tayanah O'Donnel & Josephine Mummery, with even harsher weather events predicted for coming decades. Clearly, it's just the time for Australia to eliminate funding for research on adapting to climate change. more...
The Kimblewick hunt on its Boxing Day meet, 2016. Photo: Roger Marks via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Foxhunting hounds and bovine TB - why the official silence?

Lesley Docksey

15th May 2017

Teresa May's promise to bring back foxhunting has proved one of the most unpopular items in the Tories' election platform. So we should not be surprised at the official silence over the TB-infected hounds in the Kimblewick hunt, writes Lesley Docksey. Nor, given the political power of foxhunting landowners, should we be surprised that officials are shrugging off any idea that bad biosecurity in hunt kennels could possibly have anything to do with TB in cattle. more...

Nuclear waste: Planning for the next million years

Ruby Russell / China Dialogue

3rd May, 2017

It's over 30 years now since the Chernobyl disaster yet there is still no consensus on what to do about nuclear waste, writes RUBY RUSSELL more...

ECOLOGIST COOKIES

Using this website means you agree to us using simple cookies.

More information here...

 

FOLLOW
THE ECOLOGIST

 

Help us keep the Ecologist platform going

Since 2012, the Ecologist has been owned and published by a small UK-based charity called the Resurgence Trust. We work hard to support the kind of independent journalism and comment that we know Ecologist readers enjoy but we need your help to keep going. We do all this on a very small budget with a very small editorial team and so joining the Trust or making a donation will show us you value our work and support the platform which is currently offered as a free service.

Join The Resurgence TrustDonate to support the Resurgence Trust