The Ecologist

 

africa: 25/50 of 119
« back | next »

Xoroxloo Duxee died of dehydration after the Bushmen's water borehole was disabled. Photo: © Survival

Bushmen are not 'poachers' - wildlife conference protest

The Ecologist

13th February 2014

The anti-poaching conference in London today was disrupted by protests at the Botswana delegation - who call the indigenous Bushmen of the Kalahari 'poachers' and are forcing them into death camps. more...
A boy from the Lower Omo stands on the riverbank. Photo: © Survival

Congress over-rules USAID to protect abused Ethiopian tribes

The Ecologist

12th February 2014

The US Congress has outlawed the use of aid to Ethiopia to evict tribal peoples in the SW of the country - where violent expulsions are under way to clear land for cash-crop farming. more...
Shell gas flare by Oloibiri in the Niger Delta. Photo: Rhys Thom via Flickr.com.

Fighting ecocide in Nigeria

Senator Dr Bukola Saraki

5th February 2014

Ecocide is a global problem, writes Bukola Saraki, and laws are desperately needed to hold companies to account for the damage they cause. Nigeria - long despoiled with impunity by the oil industry - is just the place to start. more...
A farm near the Virunga mountains and National Park. Photo: John & Mel Kots via Flickr.com.

Virunga - police arrest 7 anti-oil gorilla defenders

The Ecologist

1st February 2014

Congolese Police have cracked down on peaceful, legal protests to keep a UK oil company out of Virunga National Park, important for its 200 mountain gorillas. more...

Hong Kong to destroy 28 tonnes of ivory

The Ecologist

23rd January 2014

In a landmark decision, the Hong Kong Endangered Species Advisory Committee has voted to destroy almost the entire ivory stockpile, 28 of its estimated 33 tons. more...
Ivory carvings depicting various sex acts on sale in Bangkok, November 2010. Photo: Thomas Quine via Flickr.com.

Give elephants a future!

Dominic Dyer

24th January 2014

Protestors will gather on Saturday at the Chinese Embassy in London to call for an end to the global ivory trade, writes Dominic Dyer. But it's not just China - the UK must also pay its part to save Africa's elephants. more...
White rhino with horn removed to reduce value to poachers near Ohrigstad, Limpopo, South Africa. Photo: Paolo via Flickr.com.

South African rhino slaughter hits all-time high

Sophie Morlin-Yron

26th January 2014

2013's illegal rhino slaughter in South Africa was the biggest ever. The population of the critically endangered black rhinos is now near the tipping point with only just over 4,000 animals left in the wild. more...
Baobab Tree (Adansonia digitata), Mapangubwe National Park, South Africa. The tree is a rich source of nutritious fruit for wildlife and humans. Photo: Martin Heigan via Flickr.com.

GMO-free bioscience to feed Africa's farming families

Howard-Yana Shapiro

19th January 2014

For 600 million rural people across Africa, the food they grow is the food they eat. A new plant breeding academy in Kenya is using advanced genomic technologies to produce more robust and nutritious crops, writes Howard-Yana Shapiro. more...

Rwandan militia murder Congo 'gorilla guardian'

The Ecologist

13 January 2014

An attack on a Park Ranger patrol in Congo's Virunga National Park has left 4 dead and 2 injured. The perpetrators? Rwandan militias linked to the 1994 genocide. more...
Elephants at Sangha-Mbaéré, Central African Republic. Photo: Nicolas Rost via Flickr.com.

Africa's elephant massacre and the growing ivory frenzy

Richard Schiffman

6th January 2014

Carved ivory elephants may already outnumber living elephants, which are being slaughtered at the unsustainable rate of 35,000 per year. Richard Schiffman reports from the Central African Republic. more...
Still from Seeds of Sovereignty.

Seeds of Sovereignty

Sharon Garfinkel

13th December 2013

The Gaia Foundation just launched its latest film - Seeds of Sovereignty. Sharon Garfinkel attended the launch - and urges all those interested food and farming, in Africa and elsewhere, to watch it. more...
Sardine discards from the Adrar in Western Sahara's territorial waters. Photo: Western Sahara Resource Watch.

EU set to join in Western Sahara fisheries plunder

Erik Hagen

6th December 2013

On 10 December, the European Parliament will vote over a huge fisheries partnership agreement with Morocco. If the agreement is approved the environment, human rights, peace and international law will all suffer. Erik Hagen reports... more...

africa: 25/50 of 119
« back | next »

China accused of stealth land grab over Mozambique's great rice project

Cecilia Anesi and Andrea Fama in co-publication with China Files

30th November 2013

China led the reclamation of the largest abandoned rice farm in Mozambique, with the blessing of the authorities. But now the company involved is accused of land grabbing and displacing thousands. Cecilia Anesi and Andrea Fama report
more...

Rhinos without borders: Release!

Les Carlisle

27th November 2013

In his third and final blog Les Carlisle meets the President of Botswana and witnesses the not-quite-to-plan release of the translocated rhinos into their new habitat ... more...
A black-backed jackal leaning over to drink from a waterhole in the Kalahari Desert. Photo: Villiers Steyn / shutterstock.com.

The great Kalahari frack attack

Jeff Barbee and Mira Dutschke in Nata, Botswana, David Smith in Johannesburg

18th November 2013

Botswana has been accused of sacrificing the Kalahari, one of the world's most precious wildlife reserves, to commercial fracking while ignoring the concerns of environmentalists and communities who could lose access to scarce water. more...

Poaching - the cheetahs of the Serengeti face extinction

By Verity Largo

16th November 2013

Wildlife crime is a multi-million dollar globalised business, ranked fourth in transnational crime in the world, with an international network sprawling across continents. Verity Largo reports from Tanzania ... more...

Rhinos without borders: across Africa

Les Carlisle

November 13th, 2013

In the second of a three part blog in which Les Carlisle joins a team of translocation experts, he travels across two Southern African countries in 48 hours with the aid of armed guards to safely deliver 6 rhino to their new homes ... more...

Rhinos without borders: preparation & capture

Les Carlisle

1st November 2013

In the first of a three part blog in which Les Carlisle joins a team of translocation experts, he discovers the buzz of darting and blindfolding a rhino, whilst considering the absurd fact that their very existence is threatened due to the growth of an inert keratinous material on their heads ... more...

Africa's biggest wind farm opens

Oliver Tickell

26th October 2013

20,000 square kilometres of Ethiopia are suitable for grid-based wind power generation, with a total capacity of 100 GW. more...

Mozambique under threat from resource exploitation

Thembi Mutch

27th September 2013

As investors flock to the resource-rich but still poverty-stricken African nation of Mozambique, Thembi Mutch warns that - as usual - it won't be the Mozambiquans who reap the multi billion dollar rewards of an economic boom in what remains the world's second poorest country...... more...

Pedal Power

April 5th, 2013

by Hazel sillver

Donating unwanted bicycles helps others and the environment. Hazel Sillver reports on a new partner scheme between Re~Cycle and Halfords more...
Gorilla

Congo’s rangers locate first mountain gorilla families in rebel-held territory

The Ecologist

7th August, 2012

Rangers have detected gorilla families in Virunga National Park for the first time since fighting broke out between M23 rebels and government forces earlier this year more...
Acacia tree in the desert

The Great Green Wall

Bobby Bascomb

12th July, 2012

Africa’s answer to climate change is a proposed 4,000-mile long, nine mile wide wall of trees stretching from Senegal to Djibouti. Designed to stop encroaching desertification, some interpret the project (and its benefits) literally whilst others see it as more of a metaphor. Despite this split, the project is now taking root in Senegal where they have already planted 50,000 acres of trees. more...
San vs wild: what the San can teach us about living with climate change

San vs wild: what the San people can teach us about living with climate change

Ruth Styles

23rd May, 2012

Once derided as backwards, the southern African San tribe’s love of nature is now bringing them real rewards, as well as offering an insight into how humans can survive with little or no water. Ruth Styles travelled to meet them in Namibia
more...
The New Scramble for Africa

The New Scramble for Africa

Mark Newton

9th May, 2012

From slave labour to armed conflict, our thirst for natural resources has created serious problems for Africa. Pádraig Carmody’s latest book attempts to unravel the moral morass, says Mark Newton more...

ECOLOGIST COOKIES

Using this website means you agree to us using simple cookies.

More information here...

 

FOLLOW
THE ECOLOGIST