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Local currencies, like these Totnes and Stroud 'pounds' are intended to stimulate local economic resilience and keep benefits within communities. But is there a better way to achieve the same ends, everywhere? Photo: London Permaculture via Flickr.

Closing the money loop to build resilient local economies

Bran Knowles & Michael Hallam

21st July 2014

Using local currencies to stimulate local economies and revalue local labour over imported products and resources sounds like a great idea - but recent experiences have proved disappointing. Are there other ways to 'close the money loop'? more...
Barn swallow chicks (Hirundo rustica) at Arrábida (Quinta do Camalhão), Setúbal, Portugal. This insectivorous species is among those impacted by imidacloprid. Photo: Jose Sousa via Flickr.

It's not just the bees! 'Neonic' pesticides linked to bird declines

Helen Thompson

17th July 2014

A study published today in Nature shows a strong correlation between concentrations of a popular neonicotinoid pesticide in water, and bird declines, writes Helen Thompson. Regulators are under pressure to tighten up, but the industry still claims there's 'no substantiated evidence'. more...
Dark clouds gather over a sunset industry - represented by a Chevron oil tanker. Photo: Jamie Grant via Flickr.

Fossil fuels the 'new sub-prime crisis'

Nathan Wood

14th July 2014

The UK's conservative Daily Telegraph warns: investors in fossil fuels are 'throwing good money after bad', reports Nathan Wood, as renewable energy takes off leaving a potential $19 trillion of oil assets 'stranded'. more...
Luke Marion, installer Chris Jardine and Barbara Hammond connect the 140kW scheme's last panel, completing Oxford's biggest solar installation.

Pioneering community renewables in Oxford

Wendy Twist

11th July 2014

A partnership between an Oxford-based social enterprise and the local Council provides a blueprint for financing community energy projects, writes Wendy Twist. And with £2.3 million in the bank, things are really starting to move ... more...
Wylfa nuclear power station on Anglesey, Wales. Photo: Joe Dunckley via Flickr.

Nuclear power is no answer to global warming

Ian Fairlie

10th July 2014

If we're serious about cutting CO2 emissions, there's no place for nuclear power, writes Ian Fairlie - because it's the least cost-effective way to do it. By far the best way is to improve energy efficiency. But tell the Government the truth, and it'll close you down. more...
Red wolves are clinging on to existence in a few thousand kilometres of the southeastern US. Photo: B. Bartel / USFWS, CC BY-SA

Red wolf extinction fear as US budget cuts bite

Joseph Hinton

7th July 2014

The US Fish and Wildlife Service has done pioneering conservation work to save North America's endangered Red Wolf, under threat from shooting and inter-breeding with coyotes. But now federal budget cuts are putting all that - and the Red wolf itself - at risk. more...
Criminals? Protest against Kundakulam nuclear power station in Tamil Nadu, India. Photo: Joseph Lazer / Wikimedia Commons.

India - now nuclear and environmental dissent is a crime

Kumar Sundaram

4th July 2014

In modern India any form of dissent from the neoliberal corporate model of development is being criminalised, writes Kumar Sundaram. Opponents of nuclear power, coal mines, GMOs, giant dams, are all under attack as enemies of the state and a threat to economic growth. more...
Neonicotinoid insecticides are killing more than just bees - entire farmland ecosystems are being poisoned. Photo: honeybees (Apis mellifera) on wild fennel, Albany, California, by Jack Wolf via Flickr.

Neonicotinoids are poisoning entire farmland ecosystems

Damian Carrington / The Guardian

2nd July 2014

The widespread use of neonicotinoid insecticides is causing a neurotoxic overload afflicting entire farm ecosystems from earthworms to bees, other pollinators and birds, writes Damian Carrington. A collapse in food production may inevitably follow. more...
Could high speed railways transform the economy of England's ailing North? Photo: trains at Manchester Piccadilly station by Roger Marks.

Put high speed rail where it can really help - in the North of England

Ian Wray

30th June 2014

High speed railways connecting Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Huddersfield and Sheffield could transform the economy of the north of England, writes Ian Wray - creating a new mega-city that could challenge London's over-dominance. more...
Hen Harrier (Circus cyaneus) in Russia's Altai Mountains. Photo: Sergey Yeliseev via Flickr.

The grouse shooting industry is out of control - it must be regulated

Martin Harper / RSPB

27th June 2014

Intensive grouse shooting on England's uplands is doing huge damage to fragile ecosystems, writes Martin Harper - and to the 'protected' hen harrier. It's high time to bring this industry under control with a new licencing system. more...
Improving public transport is one of the key measures that could cut GHG emissions, increase 'gross world product' by $2.6 trillion and save a million lives. Photo: Mumbai bus by Patrik M. Loeff via Flickr.

World Bank: tackle global warming and add $2 trillion to global economy, save a million lives

Chris Rose

30th June 2014

Tackling global warming with better public transport, increased energy efficiency, renewable energy, clean cookstoves, better waste management could increase global GDP by $2.6 trillion. The alternative is growing risk from harshening climates ... more...
The Arctic Red king crab, Paralithodes camtschaticus, is causing ecological havoc as it devours its way down Norway's coast. It can reach a leg-span of 1.8m. Photo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration / Wikimedia Commons.

The Arctic shipping boom - a bonanza for invasive exotic species

Natasha Geiling / Smithsonian

27th June 2014

As the Arctic warms and its ice melts, growing numbers freight ships are reaping big savings from the 'Arctic short cut'. But this is creating a huge risk of invasive species spreading in ballast water and on hulls - disrupting both Arctic and temperate ecosystems. more...

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A former undocumented worker in the USA, Marvin Garcia Salas shares food with his son, Jesus, at home in Chiapas, Mexico. Photo: Bread for the World via Flickr.

Adapt or survive? How migration creates climate resilience

Alex Randall

26th June 2014

Migration is an essential component of strategies to adapt to changing climates, writes Alex Randall. Greens should welcome migrants and support their efforts to build climate resilience in their home communities. more...
Southall High Street, West London. Photo: Jonas via Flickr.

Blaming migration for our problems is dangerous and wrong

Adam Ramsay

21st June 2014

Britain's deep-seated environmental and economic problems have nothing to do with immigration, writes Adam Ramsay, and everything to do with our unjust and divisive social order, and the austerity that is being inflicted on us by an oppressive ruling class. more...
'How many more can we take?' screams a Daily Mail headline. Photo: Gideon via Flickr.

Love immigrants, hate immigration

Rupert Read

19th June 2014

The quest for never-ending economic growth demands high levels of immigration, writes Rupert Read - as do the demands of capital for pools of educated, needy, obeisant, low waged workers. Can we love individual immigrants, but hate mass immigration? more...
a female Monarch Butterflyen (Danaus plexippus) laying an egg on a Mexican Milkweed (Asclepias curassavica ) at the Tyler Arboretum. Photo: © Derek Ramsey via Wikimedia.

Heavy herbicide use on GMO crops raises Monarch butterfly extinction fear

John Pleasants

10th June 2014

Thanks to herbicide use on GMO crops in the US and Canada, Monarch butterfly numbers have crashed - the milkweeds the larvae feed on now survive mainly in 'conservation reserve' land and roadsides - and there's a 5% chance the Monarch will be extinct within 100 years. more...
A forest web, caught in a passing sunbeam. Photo: Julia Hodgson.

Living symphonies in the forest

Laurence Rose

6th June 2014

A new and deceptively sophisticated installation is about artists, audience and nature itself connecting in real time, writes Laurence Rose, who visited a Living Symphony in Thetford Forest. more...
A young demonstrator in Oxford yesterday calling on the University to divest from fossil fuels. Photo: Zoe Broughton.

Oxford University 'must divest from fossil fuels'

The Ecologist

1st June 2014

59 University of Oxford academics have signed an open letter urging the University to 'take action on climate change' by ridding its £3.8bn endowment of investments in fossil fuel companies, as hundreds march to demand change. more...
A Glasgow smokestack. Photo: Jarod Carruthers via Flickr.

Without transparency, Europe's carbon market reform will fail

Luca Taschini & Josh Gregory

1st June 2014

The EU's system for trading carbon emissions has cost consumers dear, while delivering few carbon reductions. Reforms are urgently needed, write Luca Taschini & Josh Gregory, and first among these is to open the market up to public scrutiny. more...
The Most Beautiful Place in the World: IMHO - Torres Del Paine National Park, Chile. This amazing light lasted for only a couple of minutes at sunrise. The rest of the day was cloudy and overcast. Photo: © Peter Essick.

Our beautiful, fragile world

Edgar Vaid

26th June 2014

There is much merit in the cliché that 'a picture is worth a thousand words', writes Edgar Vaid, but 'Our Beautiful, Fragile World' suggests that great photography complemented by explanatory text is worth even more ... more...
From derelict fishing gear to carpet. Photo: USFWS Puget Sound Coastal Program / Joan Drinkwin via Flickr.

Carpet giant Interface goes for 'sustainability gold'

Sophie Morlin-Yron

27th May 2014

Interface's sustainability model shows how large industrial companies can slash their carbon emissions and other environmental impacts without compromising profitability, reports Sophie Morlin-Yron. The key is to aim high! more...

Resurgence Summer Camp

Resurgence in Action at Green and Away

A weekend of talks, music, crafts and walks hosted by Satish Kumar at Europe's foremost sustainable conference centre. Off-grid, sustainable living in action. more...
Yasuni National Park. Source: http://www.ecohustler.co.uk/.

Ecuador's tribes declare 'national mobilization' against oil and mining

David Dene

24th May 2014

Ecuador is facing an unprecedented confrontation between a 'progressive' left-leaning government and a national coalition of indigenous peoples determined to stop vast oil and mining projects taking place on their community land and villages. more...
Mohan Munasinghe, from  www.mohanmunasinghe.com/.

Confronting consumption: an interview with Mohan Munasinghe

Noah M. Sachs

23rd May 2014

You can actually be better off, healthier and happier with less consumption, says Munasinghe. And it's not just rich countries that need to change, he told Noah Sachs - poor countries too must develop sustainably, or the Earth's resources will simply run out. more...
It looks like the future - but which way does the wealth travel? High speed trains in Taiwan. Photo: Ben via Flickr.

HS2 - the wealth will 'suck out' to London, not 'trickle-down' to the North

Tony Payne

23rd May 2014

Supporters of HS2 assert that it will cause prosperity to trickle down from London to the entire North of England, writes Tony Payne. But economic theory and hard experience tell us that the reverse is more probable - that it will help London to 'suck out' northern wealth. more...

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