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Ringhals nuclear power plant in Sweden by Vattenfall via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

No way nukes! Challenging the mainstream 'concensus' for nuclear power

Dr David Lowry

22nd April 2015

All the 'main' political parties are backing nuclear power in bold defiance of all the evidence that it's expensive, dangerous and not even low-carbon, writes David Lowry. Even George Osborne just admitted that Hinkley C is 'unaffordable' - but supports it anyway. For a rational nuclear policy, the way is Green. more...
Protest at Coca Cola's bottling plant at Plachmada, Kerala. The plant has since been closed for rampant pollution. Photo: kasuga sho via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Campaigners defeat Coca-Cola plant in South India

The Ecologist

21st April 2015

Local campaigners fearful of water shortages and industrial pollution have forced state authorities to cancel an unpopular plan to allocate land for a Coca-Cola bottling plant in Tamil Nadu, India. more...
A polar bear keeps close to her young along the Beaufort Sea coast in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Susanne Miller / USFWS via Flickr (CC BY).

Polar bears at risk from pollution as well as warmth

Tim Radford

24th April 2015

As if melting ice in Polar bears' Arctic habitat was not enough, Norwegian scientists have found that organic pollutants such as pesticide residues are disrupting their thyroid and endocrine systems, adding a further threat to the species' survival. more...
A fox caught in a snare set on a fence. The overwhelming majority of snares are used, not to protect farm animals or catch rabbits for the pot, but to kill predators around 'game' birds like pheasants and grouse. Photo: Leage Against Cruel Sports.

Making our votes count for wildlife and animals!

Joe Duckworth

21st April 2015

If you care about the wildlife in our countryside and the welfare of animals, then make your vote count in the general election, writes Joe Duckworth. Backed by Cameron himself, 'country sports' enthusiasts are getting organised to support pro-killing candidates. We must be even more effective in opposing them. more...
The Monarch butterfly has become an icon of the anti-GMO movement following the species' population collapse in North America - poisoned by 'Bt' GMO crops and starved out by the the destruction of its food plants by massive application of glyphosate on 'r

The existential crisis facing GMOs - they don't work and we don't want them

Colin Todhunter

21st April 2015

The GMO industry has legitimised itself via a vast network of lobbyists and the assiduous capture of the politicians, regulators and scientists that should be holding it to account, writes Colin Todhunter. But as the failure of the GM revolution and its disastrous impacts become ever more evident, the industry's legitimacy is fast eroding away. more...
Skater girl portrait (Abigail Tarttelin, author of 'Golden Boy'), Atlantic City, NJ. Photo: Chris Goldberg via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

The law of the forest and the freedom of the streets

Ken Worpole

19th April 2015

Forests are the traditional refuge of rebels, dissidents and all who seek freedom from the strictures of civilization, writes Ken Worpole. But for all the idea lives on in our hearts and minds, that role has now been usurped by our cities. Now, just as our forests have been enclosed and subdued, so our cities face a similar fate - one we must resist to preserve our liberty. more...
President Nasheed meets the press after the Worlds first ever underwater cabinet meeting held at Girifushi island, 17th October 2009. Photo: Mauroof Khaleel / Presidency Maldives via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

#JeSuisNasheed - standing with the green 'Mandela of the Maldives'

Anders Henriksen & Lykke Friis

16th April 2015

After restoring democracy to the Maldives in 2008 President Nasheed became a world leader on climate change. But four years later the old regime deposed him in a coup, and now he has been imprisoned for 13 years on bogus 'terrorism' charges. Now we must stand with Nasheed - by starving the island state of its tourism revenues. more...
Phyllis Omido, 2015 Goldman Environmental Prize winner for Africa, galvanized the community in Mombasa to shut down a smelter that was causing lead poisoning among its workers and local residents. (Photo: Goldman Environmental Prize)

Lead poisoning - fighting industrial pollution in Kenya is a dangerous business

Sophie Morlin-Yron

Monday 20 April 2015

Lead poisoning from industrial pollution has imposed a terrible toll on Kenyans, writes Sophie Morlin-Yron, and single mother Phyllis Omido is no exception - lead from a nearby metal refinery badly damaged her own son's health. But it was when she decided to fight back against the polluters that a whole new realm of threats and dangers opened up. more...
Just taste the poly-aromatic hydrocarbons! London Air Pollution View from Hackney, 10th April 2015. Photo: DAVID HOLT via Flickr (CC BY-SA).

To save 30,000 British lives a year, the Government must act now on air pollution

James Thornton, ClientEarth

15th April 2015

The UK Government will be in the Supreme Court tomorrow accused of 'dragging its feet' over an EU air pollution law that should be saving tens of thousands of British lives a year, writes James Thornton. Instead of defending its inaction, the Government should make an immediate start on cleaning our filthy air. more...
Precious little harmony here: a building site in Beijing. But change is on the way. Photo: Thembi Mutch.

Amid the smoke and chaos of 'development', China seeks a return to ancient harmony

Thembi Mutch

19th May 2015

China is struggling with a myriad of environmental challenges, writes Thembi Mutch, as the country 'develops' at breakneck speed with massive construction projects, and industrial expansion. But amid the chaos and filth, the Chinese people are mindful of their history and ancient principles of harmony with nature - something that many are working hard to restore. more...
Cycling in Beijing. Photo: Thembi Mutch.

Chinese environmentalism: driven by a deep desire for healthy living and wholesome food

Thembi Mutch

24th April 2015

China's growing 'bling' culture has taken off big time, writes Thembi Mutch - yet it is widely reviled among ordinary people who in the face of China's industrial boom hold resolutely to traditional values of economy and frugality, quietly yearning for the old days of clean air and safe, wholesome food to fill their stomachs. more...
Austerity for the rich! Image: Michael Thompson via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Challenging 'austerity' and its self-contradicting narrative

Rupert Read & Bennet Francis

14th April 2015

As the Greens announce anti-austerity policies in their election manifesto, Bennet Francis & Rupert Read examine the austerity narrative - and find it doesn't add up. By insisting that deficit reduction is necessary for growth, the politicians of austerity undermine the very meaning of the 'prosperity' they promise us. more...

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A tractor spraying unknown chemicals in the British countryside. Photo: Billy Ridgers, author provided.

Thank you Greens! Now other parties too must keep us safe from pesticides

Georgina Downs

14th April 2015

The Green Party manifesto, published today, pledges to enact long overdue restrictions on the use of toxic pesticides to protect rural residents and children from adverse health impacts, writes Georgina Downs. Now all political parties must follow where the Greens have led. more...
When Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon isn't kissing babies, she manages to find time to reach a friendly understanding with fracking bosses. Photo: Barbara Agnew via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

Scotland's 'fracking moratorium' - a free-for-all in disguise?

Kyla Mandel / DeSmog UK

13th April 2015

Nicola Sturgeon secretly met with pro-fracking firm Ineos on the very same day that Scotland announced its shale gas moratorium, writes Kyla Mandel - giving rise to fears of a under-the-table stitch-up. more...
Small fishing boats at Lyme Regis, Dorset, where England's first big marine Protected Area was designated. Photo: Sue Hasker via Flickr (CC BY-ND).

To protect our seas, first we must reclaim them from 'Big Fishing'

Horatio Morpurgo

10th April 2015

There's strong public support for protecting marine wildlife, writes Horatio Morpurgo - so why aren't politicians championing the cause? Labour and Tories alike fear to challenge the big fishing companies that have come to believe they own Britain's offshore waters and seabed. Now it's up to use to prove they're wrong. more...
The dazzling pace of development in China comes at a human cost - of those dispossessed to make way for it all. Tianmu is one of the villages in the way of the expansion of Tianjin, pictured. Photo: Yang Aijun / World Bank via Flickr (CC-BY-NC-ND).

Tianjin, China: a village 'land grab' protest spells trouble for the Communist state

Samantha Hoffman & Jonathan Sullivan

11th April 2015

Rising anger by China's dispossessed - those displaced from their homes, villages and farms to make way for ever-expanding cities and infrastructure - is posing an existential threat to the ruling regime, write Samantha Hoffman & Jonathan Sullivan. At the root of the problem is the state's inability to tackle endemic official corruption and deliver justice to its citizens. more...
A Dassault Super-Etendard aircraft of the kind that sunk the UK's HMS Sheffield with an Exocet missile in the 1982 Falklands war. But after the UK extracted secret codes from the French, it could disarm them in mid air. Just like the US will surely be abl

Nuclear weapons are more likely to annihilate the UK, than to save it

Oliver Tickell

9th April 2015

The eruption of nuclear weapons into today's election campaign should ignite a real debate over the UK's Trident missile system, writes Oliver Tickell. The notion that the UK is more secure with nuclear weapons than without is a dangerous illusion. The truth is the reverse - they are far more likely to make the UK a nuclear target, than to protect it. more...
A 'money-burning' event organised by the Miami Tea Party to oppose a 46,000 acre conservation land purchase - but were the 'protestors' all actors? So it would seem. Photo: from Youtube video by Miami Tea Party.

Tea Party's fake protestors for Big Sugar against Florida Everglades

Oliver Tickell

8rg April 2015

The Tea Party of Miami put up a convincing demo last week to oppose a 'land grab' that would see 46,000 acres of sugar farm land restored for Everglades conservation. Just one problem - the 'protestors' were actors each being paid $75 for the two-hour shift. more...
BAE Systems 'Hawks' on show at Yeovilton Air Day 2010. They also kill people - among them resistance fighters in East Timor opposing Indonesia's illegal occupation of their country. Photo: Andrew Dennes via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

The BBC's silent scandal - the arms magnate at the top

Harry Blain

8th April 2015

When seeking a new Vice-Chair for the BBC Trust, would you seek out a distinguished journalist? Or the Chairman of Europe's biggest arms company, one with a murky past of corruption and supplying deadly weapons to despotic governments? For the British oligarchy, writes Harry Blain, the answer is obvious. more...
Dead fish on the beach at Cape San Blas, Florida, after a 'red tide' event in the Gulf of Mexico. Photo: Judy Baxter via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Ocean 'dead zones' are spreading - and that spells disaster for fish

Lee Bryant

9th April 2015

Oxygen levels in our oceans are falling, writes Lee Bryant, producing growing 'dead zones' where only the hardiest organisms can survive. The causes are simple: pollution with nutrient-rich wastes, and global warming. But the only solution is to stop it happening - or wait for 1,000 years. more...
'Pregnant health'. Photo: il-young ko via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Air pollution may be damaging children's brains - before they are even born

Frank Kelly & Julia Kelly

10th April 2015

As south-east England goes onto an air pollution 'red alert', write Frank Kelly & Julia Kelly, be warned: in addition to causing respiratory and cardiovascular damage, the microscopic particles befouling the air also impact on the brains and nervous systems of unborn children whose mothers suffer high levels of exposure. more...
Greenpeace volunteers on board Shell's 'Polar Explorer' oil rig in the Pacific Ocean. Photo: Miriam Friedrich / Greenpeace.

Greenpeace occupies Shell rig after Arctic drilling go-ahead

Christine Ottery & Oliver Tickell

7th April 2015

Days after Shell received US Government backing for its plans to drill in the Chukchi Sea in the Alaskan Arctic, volunteers from Greenpeace have occupied its 'Polar Pioneer' oil rig in the Pacific Ocean to demand a halt to all Arctic oil exploration. more...
Rajendra Singh believes conservation is vital to combat future 'water wars' and climate change. Photo: Deccan Chronicle.

'Water man of India' makes rivers flow again

Pramila Krishnan

8th April 2015

The revival of traditional rainwater harvesting has restored flow to rivers in India's driest state, Rajasthan - thanks to the tireless efforts of Rajendra Singh, recent winner of a Stockholm water prize. And as Pramila Krishnan discovered in a fascinating meeting, Singh's techniques, and his philosophy, are of truly global significance. more...
Utah's Book Cliffs are no empty wasteland - but that's what the tar sands industry is set to turn them into. Photo:  Loco Steve via Flickr (CC BY).

Wilderness Society's 'Grand Compromise' is a fossil-fuelled sell out

Alexander Reid Ross

7th April 2015

A deal to give up 500,000 acres of public lands in Utah to the tar sands industry in return for 1.5 million acres of industry is a sacrifice too far, writes Alexander Reid Ross, as it disclaims the wider costs of massive water use and contamination in the headwaters of the Colorado River, already seriously stressed by drought. more...
Still from the introduction to ITV's Election 20125 Leaders' Debate with Ed Miliband, Leanne Wood and Nicola Sturgeon, with presenter Julie Etchingham. Photo: ITV.

Easter rising - progressive politics is reborn!

Oliver Tickell

3rd March 2015

The real significance of last night's TV debate was the vigorous assertion of a new progressive politics in Britain, expressed by the 'trimulierate' of female party leaders from the SNP, Greens and Plaid Cymru - the three sharing a positive vision of a green, fair, inclusive future in which all participate in the nation's prosperity. more...

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