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Wildlife charity backs EU court case against Poland for failing to protect forest

Brendan Montague

18th July, 2017

Białowieża Forest is the best preserved forest ecosystem and the best preserved old-growth lowland forest in Europe. But it is under threat, reports BRENDAN MONTAGUE more...

Kick-starting an African clean energy revolution - one pedal at a time

Joe Ware

27th June, 2017

The cyclists of the Tour de France may not set off until next week but in Kenya a group of young people have taken to their bikes to raise awareness about the power of sustainable energy ahead of the country's general election on August 8.
JOE WARE reports
more...

A People's Food Policy - grassroot food and farming groups call for a more just food system

26th June, 2017


As the Brexit negotiations begin, a coalition of grassroots food and farming organisations today launch ‘A People's Food Policy' calling for England to develop a more progressive food policy in advance of leaving the EU. Scotland is already in the process of adopting national food policies and is currently developing a ‘Good Food Nation Bill', while England has yet to make any progress
more...

Foxhounds and bovine TB edges (finally) into the news

Lesley Docksey

23rd June, 2017

The publication of research into foxhounds and bovine TB is being hidden behind a cover up, with an outbreak in one hunt's pack kept secret for three months before the news leaked out, writes LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Conference Seeks Security for Embattled Environmental Activists

Olesia Plokhii

19th June, 2017

This week, the first-ever Forest Defenders Conference, organized by environmental activist support group Not1More, takes place (21st-22nd June) at St. Hugh's College in Oxford, UK. The aim of the conference is to highlight the growing risks and help develop safety strategies for frontline environmentalists who face increasing violence for their work.
OLESIA PLOKHII reports
more...

Ecologist Special Report: EU must back up its words with action on deforestation

Sébastien Risso

19th June, 2017

Though the Earth loses forests at an alarming rate, the EU has yet to take decisive action against the most severe causes of deforestation. The EU must now act swiftly to ensure its consumption no longer drives forest destruction, writes SÉBASTIEN RISSO more...

Diners want the food industry to ‘clean up' its act and tell the truth about GMO ingredients

Beyond GM

9th June, 2017

Almost since the advent of genetic engineering the food industry, the research establishment and parts of the media have been saying that the public is becoming more accepting of the technology. However, with no credible independent evidence to support this view it remains little more than wishful thinking and as this new survey, conducted by Beyond GM shows, most diners want to see more transparency about what's actually in our food more...
The 14th 'Free Terra' Camp in Praça dos Ipês, Brasília, during April 24-28 2017. Over 4,000 representatives from 200 indigenous peoples from all regions of the country were present in a large demonstration of strength of the indigenous movement. Photo:

Brazil: Increase in land killings as political crisis threatens Amazon

Joe Sandler Clarke & Sam Cowie / Greenpeace Energydesk

7th June 2017

Impunity reigns in the Amazon, write Joe Sandler Clarke & Sam Cowie, and the indigenous peoples of the forest are the big losers as they suffer repeated killings and land grabs. Big cuts to Funai, the agency meant to protect Brazil's indigenous tribes, have encouraged land barons to expand their land holdings into indigenous territories and murder any who resist. more...

Ecologist Exclusive: Theresa May's views on fox hunting lack scientific validity

Iain McGill & Colleagues

5th June, 2017

Theresa May's suggestion that she was going to allow a free vote in Parliament on repealing the Hunting Act met with howls of outrage , not least from vets concerned about animal welfare. Dr Iain McGill (who spoke at the recent Keep the Ban protest) and his colleagues write here about her ignorance on hunting and, given the Kimblewick hounds issue, the danger posed by making hunting legal again. more...

Poland's primeval forest is under serious attack

Nick Meynen

2nd June, 2017

Polish activists have this week chained themselves up to machines used to cut a 9000-year-old forest in a bid to stop the destruction of trees for what is clearly commercial gain. NICK MEYNEN reports more...

Exxon shareholders back resolution requiring the oil major to disclose the impact of climate policies on its business

Remo Bebié, Finance Dialogue

1st June, 2017

As we wait to learn whether (later today) Trump will pull the US out of the Paris Agreement, Remo Bebié of Finance Dialogue shares his briefing report of the what is being seen as growing demands that oil companies incorporate the international deal in their business models more...

A Green Alternative to Styrofoam

Laura Briggs

1st June, 2017

No More Styrofoam presents the WooBox - a new alternative to the use of Styrofoam in food transportation - and a Serbian project that is supported by a crowdfunding campaign that launches today (1st June 2017). LAURA BRIGGS reports more...

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Were the mice in the 2001 Kumar study suffering from an oncogenic virus infection? There's no evidence that they were. Photo: Mouse (Mus musculus) by George Shuklin (talk) via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).

EFSA dismissed glyphosate cancer study after unsupported 'viral infection' slur of ex-EPA official

Claire Robinson / GMWatch

25th May 2017

A 2001 study that showed that glyphosate caused cancer in mice was ignored by the EFSA after the unsubstantiated allegation of a former US-EPA official that the mice used in the study were suffering from a viral infection that might have given them cancer, writes Claire Robinson. The EFSA failed to properly investigate the allegation, which appears to originate in a document linked to Monsanto, maker of the world's top-selling herbicide, glyphosate-based Roundup. more...
David Headley can light his spring on fire. David asked the PA Dept. of Environmental Protection to take a look. The DEP inspector told David it was probably a rotting log. The spring bubbles almost constantly, and has now for about two years since Marcel

Whitehall's fracking science failure: shale gas really is worse for climate than coal

Paul Mobbs

24th May 2017

The UK government claim that fracking is a 'clean' energy source rests on the conclusions of a single scientific paper, writes Paul Mobbs. And now that paper has been conclusively invalidated: it uses misleading figures that understate the methane emissions from fracking, and subsequent findings have left it totally discredited. Yet the paper is still being quoted to justify fracking, and the fool the public on its climate change impacts. more...
Greenham Farm smallholders. Photo: Abbie Trayler Smith / ELC.

Ecological agriculture: investing today in tomorrow's farms

Phil Moore

22nd May 2017

Ecological farming has taken root in the UK, writes Phil Moore: drawing inspiration from the past while employing the latest ideas and techniques from organic, no-dig, permaculture, agroecology and agroforestry methods. But with agricultural fields selling for up to £10,000 an acre, there's a big difficultly for many would-be eco-farmers: access to land. Now, with public support, that's a problem the Ecological Land Cooperative is determined to solve. more...
What's the most import ingredient of hummus? No, not chickpeas, olive oil or tahini ... Garlic! Photo: Paul Mobbs (still from video).

Hummus and mindfulness: skills, resilience and relaxation beyond consumerism

Paul Mobbs

16th May 2017

Food is so much more than a heap of pre-processed consumer products snatched from supermarket shelves or websites, writes Paul Mobbs. And the key to unlocking its deeper meaning is to prepare, bake and cook your own from basic ingredients: in the process expressing creativity, developing skills, building independence from the industrial food machine, meditating in doing, saving money ... and making some pretty amazing hummus! more...
Sunset years ... power plant and Exxon Mobil oil refinery in Joliet, Illinois. Photo: Greg Wass via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Oil industry's sunset years: low prices, weak demand, poor outlook

Paul Brown

15th May 2017

With oil prices remaining low, the world's oil industry is facing bleak years ahead, writes Paul Brown. The global push to decarbonise the economy, combined with surging renewable energy and the trend to more efficient and electric vehicles, is denting investor confidence and pointing to the shrinking away of a once mighty and profitable industry. more...

Ecologist Special Report: Divesting from investment in fossil fuels gains momentum in the UK

Remo Bebié, Finance Dialogue,

15th May, 2017

Since the beginning of the year, increasing efforts by both public and private institutions to reduce their exposure to fossil fuel investments have emerged and over the weekend, UK campaigners further stepped up the pressure in a serious of co-ordinated Global Divestment Mobilisation (GDM) calls for continued divestment. Remo Bebié takes an overview more...

The Conflicting Interests of Climate Negotiations: Who's really running the show?

Arthur Wyns

11th May, 2017

Reporting from this month's international climate conference in Bonn - a preliminary to this year's COP23 in November - ARTHUR WYNS explores the glaring conflicts of interests which sees fossil fuel lobbyists in the same room as delegates discussing policy to avert climate catastrophe more...
While Trump tries to extend the wall across the US-Mexico frontier, seen here at Nogales, Mexico could build a solar farm along the border, generating 2GW of power, and attracting technology, investment and jobs from the North. Photo: Jonathan McIntosh vi

Mexico's expiring oil and Trump's wall: the future is solar

Jeremy Leggett

11th May 2017

Mexico's oil looks set to run out within a decade, writes Jeremy Leggett, and it can hardly rely on Trump's America to make up the difference. But Mexico enjoys abundant sunshine, and the cost of solar power generation is falling fast. Let Trump tie America's economy to debt-financed fossil fuels. Mexico's future prosperity will come from harnessing its inexhaustible solar riches. more...
Mural in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in celebration of indigenous culture by the artist Eduardo Kobra. Photo: Stefano Ravalli via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Brazil: Amazon's Indians, rainforest under attack

Jan Rocha / Climate News Network

10th May 2017

Attacks on Amazon Indians and on their land rights are threatening vital areas of rainforest, writes Jan Rocha. Meanwhile FUNAI, the agency responsible for safeguarding indigenous tribes is being forced to withdraw from key conflict zones due to underfunding, while Indians' attempts to assert their rights are met with state violence. more...
The Carrizo Plain National Monument, California, represents the last remnant of a once vast grassland. It is just one of 27 at risk form Trump's executive order. Photo: Steve Corey via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Trump's National Monument order could open 2.7 million acres to oil, gas, coal

Lawrence Carter & Joe Sandler Clarke / Greenpeace Energydesk

12th May 2017

President Trump's recent executive order could open an area of America's most precious landscapes bigger than Yellowstone to oil drilling and coal mining, write Lawrence Carter & Joe Sandler Clarke. The 27 monuments 'under review' harbour huge volumes of oil, gas and coal: just what's needed to fuel Trump's vision of fossil fuel-led development - never mind the cost to scenery, wildlife, historic sites and indigenous cultures. more...

No Seed... No Food

Laura Briggs

10th May, 2017

With the diversity of food crops falling dramatically and just three giant corporations controlling over 75 per cent of the global seed supply, it's no wonder people feel disconnected from their food. LAURA BRIGGS learns more about a new UK Seed Co-operative which aims to redress the balance more...

Politicians take note (if you want our vote)... Renewables are now more popular than ever

Joe Ware

If UK politicians want to reunite the country and garner votes they'd do well to embrace renewables in their manifestos, writes JOE WARE more...
ADB's 'two finger salute' to the world on climate change: the Tata Mundra coal power station in India, under construction in 2010. Photo: Joe Athialy via Flickr (CC BY-NC-SA).

Asian Development Bank must end its 50 year addiction to coal!

Hemantha Withanage

4th May 2017

The mighty Asian Development Bank is celebrating its 50th birthday this week in Yokohama, Japan, writes Hemantha Withanage. But the victims of ADB's $3 billion coal funding have little to be glad of - whether local communities impacted by mines and power stations, or people everywhere suffering climate change. ADB must stop financing coal now! more...

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