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Milton Friedman: Architect of Neoliberalism RIP

Paul Kingsnorth

1st December, 2006

Death is rarely something to be celebrated, but I can’t say I shed a tear last week when I heard that Milton Friedman, the father of neoliberal economics, had gone to the great free market in the sky. more...
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Backing the Bad Guys

Noreena Hertz

1st December, 2004

As the world’s poorest countries sink further and further into debt, Western corporations grow fat from government-backed projects that fuel conflicts, harm the environment and have built-in kickbacks.
more...
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A thirst for power: China in Tibet

Lynne O’Donnell

1st June, 2004

Since colonising Tibet in 1959, China has ripped out virgin forests, dug up minerals and metals, and dumped nuclear waste with little regard for the fragile ecology of the Tibetan plateau.
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Bogotá's fight for public water

Maria Teresa Ronderos

1st March, 2004

How the Colombian capital Bogotá defied the World Bank and the multinationals, refused to privatise and turned its water services into the best in the country more...
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Adopt a veg

Alexandra Abrahams

1st October, 2003

Have you ever heard of – let alone tasted – the Rats Tail radish, the Crookneck squash or the Prince of Prussia pea? We report on what’s being done to save Britain’s rich agricultural heritage.

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The Wild Wild East: Russia's Zapovedniks

Paul Webster

1st February, 2003

Russia’s zapovedniks are some of the world’s most pristine wildernesses. For 70 years they were protected ruthlessly by the Soviet system, but recently they have fallen prey to Putin, the World Bank and ecotourists. Paul Webster reports on their plight more...
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Economics Senegal

Heiner Thiessen

1st November, 2002

You can ‘structurally adjust’ an economy in a matter of years, but it takes longer to destroy a culture. Heiner Thiessen reports from Senegal on the impact of imposing a Western cash economy on a traditional African barter society
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ECAs Exposed

Simon Retallack

7th June, 2000

By using taxpayers' money to back environmentally-destructive projects around the world, ECAs are lining the pockets of multinational companies at the expense of the planet. Export credit agencies, explains Simon Retallack, are the worlds largest public financiers of environmental destruction. more...

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