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investigations: 25/50 of 122
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dolphins

Cetaceans under siege as man-made perils blight the oceans

Anthony Wall

29th December, 2011

Whales, dolphins and porpoises have no respite from oil and chemicals, fishing nets, shipping, noise pollution and a host of other dangers brought about by man's unrelenting destruction of the oceans, says Anthony Wall more...
Electricity pylons at sunset

'Soundscape ecology': the new science helping identify ecosystems at risk

David Hawkins

16th December, 2011

As industrial development and human encroachment intensifies globally, academics believe the study of natural soundscapes could teach us much about how ecosystems function - and how they are under threat more...

How eco-logging and livestock grazing can protect UK's natural landscape

Sam Campbell

9th December, 2011

A web of environmental, economic and social forces have shaped UK landscapes for years. Environmental awareness has slowed encroachment on natural areas, but serious threats persist. Is it time for a fresh approach? more...
KIM WOLHUTER

Is there room for wildlife as Africa grapples with development?

Curtis Abraham

1st December, 2011

How poaching for the illegal wildlife trade, intensive farming, climate change and population growth all threaten Africa's unique wildlife more...
ZIMBABWE

On patrol with Zimbabwe's wildlife defenders: the last hope for black rhinos?

Ruth Styles

1st December, 2011

The illegal wildlife trade threatens Zimbabwe's black rhinos with decimation. Ruth Styles reports on the Malilangwe Trust and safari company Singita's attempts to reverse the decline
more...
Dumper truck on tar sands road

Could politicians be charged with 'ecocide' if they approve tar sands pipeline?

Rosie Spinks

29th November, 2011

A law of ecocide could potentially see politicians who approve environmentally-damaging projects, like the tar sands pipeline between the US and Canada, face a court trial more...
endangered black rhino

The conservation quandary: can wildlife NGOs save Africa's animals?

Ian Michler

21st November, 2011

Conservation is a huge industry in Africa but wildlife populations across the continent are declining. So why isn't it working? more...
Bottle of milk

Where will our milk come from: 'battery' farms or free range cows?

Rosie Shute

11th November, 2011

The recent axing of the Nocton 'super-dairy' renewed interest in how our milk and cheese is produced. The Ecologist visited two dairy farms - an indoor, intensive unit and a year-round outdoor operation - to assess their very different approaches more...
Agriculture in Africa

Durban climate change conference: why farming is the biggest issue for Africa

Rosie Spinks

4th November, 2011

With little hope of a binding deal on climate change at the latest UN summit, campaigners are hoping that Africa's COP will tackle the issue that plagues the continent most: agriculture more...
mining

Spanish mountains under threat from open cast coal mining

Almudena Serpis

26th October, 2011

Almudena Serpis reports on the activists taking action against the expansion of coal mining in the beautiful and ecologically important Lacaiana valley more...
wildlife trade

Tourism has a negative impact on Laos' wildlife

Dawn Starin

14th October,2011

Tourists eager to try exotic meat and buy wildlife souvenirs in Laos are helping destroy the country's natural heritage. The consequences for both people and environment are worrying, reports Dawn Starin

more...
Sunlight through the trees

UK charity dogged by 'monocultures and rights violations' claims

Ecologist

7th October, 2011

The Jewish National Fund UK has always denied a swirl of claims over its history and activities in the Middle East, including allegations of land grabbing Palestinian villages. But campaigners want the organisation stripped of its charitable status more...

investigations: 25/50 of 122
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Ecologist Film Unit

Investigative films on key environmental and climate change issues from the Ecologist Film Unit more...

Fracking Hell – the environmental costs of the new US gas drilling boom

30th November, 2010

Jim Wickens

The gas stored in the Marcellus Shale formation is the subject of desperate drilling to secure US domestic energy supplies. But the process involved - hydraulic fracturing - is the focus of a bitter dispute over environmental damage and community rights more...
Laos hydropower

Xayaburi dam divides Laos and stirs tension over Mekong hydropower

Brendan Brady

30th September, 2011

Supporters of a controversial dam in one of Asia's poorest countries say it will bring huge economic benefits. Critics say it could threaten fisheries and rice cultivation, threatening the livelihoods of millions. Brendan Brady reports from Laos
more...
Environmental Investigation Agency

Shot, face hacked off, tusks stolen... horror of the elephants butchered for their ivory

Mary Rice

26th September, 2011

More than 3000 elephants may have been slaughtered in 2011 so far - and that's just those we know about. In Kenya, Mary Rice from the Environmental Investigation Agency witnesses the bloody reality of the global ivory trade more...
Niger's water crisis

Water trading: how the world's most vital resource is up for sale

Debika Ray

21st September, 2011

Like carbon trading, REDD and food speculation before it, the buying and selling of water is just the latest example of market principles being applied to natural resources. But just how ethical is it? Debika Ray reports more...
tomato slaves

September 2011 Monthly Subscribers Newsletter

Ecologist

16th september, 2011

In this month's newsletter we look at the fate of Britain's red squirrels and the world's polar bears, examine why Alaska's wild berries could hold vital health properties, report on allegations of corruption in Sarawak and - in a special investigation - uncover the 'slavery' behind our love affair with tinned tomatoes. To access your newsletter log in and scroll down to the bottom of the page more...
Blueberries

The struggle to save Alaska's 'illness-busting' wild berries

Jessica Wapner

7th September, 2011

Despite being used to treat diabetes and infections, knowledge of Alaska's wild berries is in danger of being lost as young indigenous people embrace western lifestyles. Jessica Wapner reports more...
red squirrel

Red squirrels under siege as conservation groups suffer financial squeeze

Sam Campbell

2nd September, 2011

In the second of our 'wildlife at risk' series, Sam Campbell reports how habitat loss, disease and funding cuts leave the iconic red squirrel facing a bleak future more...
Polar bear

Endgame for polar bears as Arctic habitat melts away

Gavin Haines

24th August, 2011

The recent polar bear attack in Norway is the latest reminder that time is running out for these iconic mammals, with runaway climate change and habitat loss. Gavin Haines reports more...
Sarawak forests

Activists challenge 'corrupt' government in the battle for Sarawak's rainforests

Alex Joseph

10th August, 2011

Land seizures, rampant logging and oil palm expansion have decimated Sarawak's forests. But now an invigorated reform movement is fighting back - accusing the government and its chief minister Abdul Taib Mahmud of duplicity. Alex Joseph reports more...
eco friendly football

Sustainability and football: why the beautiful game is getting a green makeover

Ruth Styles

3rd August, 2011

In the second part of our sport and environment mini-series, Ruth Styles reports on the efforts some football clubs are making to turn the sport into an eco-friendly one, although there's still plenty to do more...
Cycling and the environment

How the boom in climbing, biking and sailing is costing the earth

Isabella Kaminski

28th July, 2011

In the first of a two-part sport and environment special, Isabella Kaminski reports on how habitat damage, waste, nanotechnology and persistent organic pollutants are increasingly linked to our favourite outdoor pursuits more...
Glaciers

Himalayan glaciers are 'not just melting, they are dying'

Jonathan Mitchell

13th July, 2011

Many glaciers are melting away at a rapid rate. This could have serious consequences for half a billion people who depend on the ‘eternal snows’ to water their crops and for drinking. But as Jonathan Mitchell reports from Nepal, not everyone appears concerned more...

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