The Ecologist

 

us: 1/25 of 1791
next »

The future is bright for green energy and business

Jason Smith

24th July, 2017

Theresa May's government may have come to a grinding halt on environmental regulation but businesses still have a responsibility - and with it huge opportunities - to go green, argues JASON SMITH more...

Securing a Future With Water Along Peru's Rimac River Valley

Forest Ray

20th July, 2017




Along the Rimac River Valley of Peru, local farmers have taken the problem of water security into their own hands and embarked on a combined reforestation and water storage project, which not only provides safe water but has empowered the local community and, thanks to improving the mountainside soil stability, has reduced the risk of devastating landslides. FOREST RAY reports
more...

We need rights of nature legislation now to protect our home planet

Michelle Bender

7 July, 2017

We need a new paradigm for ocean governance focused on well-being and guided by principles of sustainability, ecosystem health, precaution and interconnectedness, argues MICHELLE BENDER of the US based Earth Law Centre. more...

Climate change threatens centuries' old Indigenous cultures and traditions

Ayeen Karunungan, Climate Tracker

10 July, 2017

Climate change will have a devastating impact on millions of people, threatening housing and agriculture. But it carries a terrible cost in terms of culture and tradition too. The young journalists and photographers working with CLIMATE TRACKER hope to capture something of these cultures before they are lost for ever more...

A People's Food Policy - grassroot food and farming groups call for a more just food system

26th June, 2017


As the Brexit negotiations begin, a coalition of grassroots food and farming organisations today launch ‘A People's Food Policy' calling for England to develop a more progressive food policy in advance of leaving the EU. Scotland is already in the process of adopting national food policies and is currently developing a ‘Good Food Nation Bill', while England has yet to make any progress
more...

Ecologist Special Report: Community Farm takes local council to High Court this Solstice

Matthew Newsome

21st June, 2017

A local food-production scheme, dedicated to conservation and sustainability in East Sussex, has been crowdfunding to finance the legal battle that will see it in the High Court today. The Crossing - a micro-farm providing affordable and pesticide free food for the surrounding Forest Row community - is taking its local council to the High Court to challenge a decision to turn down its application for planning permission and, say the petitioners, to fight for the rights of small food growers. MATTHEW NEWSOME reports more...

Conference Seeks Security for Embattled Environmental Activists

Olesia Plokhii

19th June, 2017

This week, the first-ever Forest Defenders Conference, organized by environmental activist support group Not1More, takes place (21st-22nd June) at St. Hugh's College in Oxford, UK. The aim of the conference is to highlight the growing risks and help develop safety strategies for frontline environmentalists who face increasing violence for their work.
OLESIA PLOKHII reports
more...

How the South Australians who dumped a nuclear dump may soon have another fight on their hands

Jim Green

15th June, 2017

The rejection of a plan to import vast amounts of high-level nuclear waste from around the world for profit was a significant result for campaigners but that threat is still far from over, writes JIM GREEN more...

Solar Irrigation Pump is Winner of the 2017 Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy and Water

Chhavi Sharma

12th June, 2017

The winner of the 2017 Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy and Water - announced today (12th June, 2017) - is Futurepump, which manufactures an affordable, highly efficient and portable solar irrigation pump aimed at the millions of smallholder farmers in Kenya and around the world, writes CHHAVI SHARMA more...

Australian Government and UNESCO are Oceans Apart on Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef

Maxine Newlands

12th June, 2017

Australia's governments and mining giant Adani have announced the go ahead for a mega mine - despite the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO) warnings over climate change and the likely impact on the Great Barrier Reef. MAXINE NEWLANDS reports more...
'Wrong way!' Roadside view of Alberta tarsands processing plant. Photo: Velcrow Ripper via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

Wrong way! A climatic baby step forward beats a giant leap back

Pete Dolack / Systemic Disorder

7th June 2017

The Paris Agreement is a severely inadequate response to the climate crisis the world now faces, writes Pete Dolack, full of vague aspirations and devoid of hard, enforceable commitments. But the impending US withdrawal is still bad news for us all - including the Trump-supporting Koch brothers, set to gain billions from their Alberta tarsands holdings. Short-term profits are a poor exchange for a less livable world, even for those making the money. more...
The 14th 'Free Terra' Camp in Praça dos Ipês, Brasília, during April 24-28 2017. Over 4,000 representatives from 200 indigenous peoples from all regions of the country were present in a large demonstration of strength of the indigenous movement. Photo:

Brazil: Increase in land killings as political crisis threatens Amazon

Joe Sandler Clarke & Sam Cowie / Greenpeace Energydesk

7th June 2017

Impunity reigns in the Amazon, write Joe Sandler Clarke & Sam Cowie, and the indigenous peoples of the forest are the big losers as they suffer repeated killings and land grabs. Big cuts to Funai, the agency meant to protect Brazil's indigenous tribes, have encouraged land barons to expand their land holdings into indigenous territories and murder any who resist. more...

us: 1/25 of 1791
next »

The future of humanity on the planet does not rest on leaders alone - thankfully!

Dorothy Grace Guerrero

6th June, 2017

For social movements and climate justice campaigners, the US abandonment of the Paris Agreement is disappointing, but there is also a unity in understanding that the future of humanity on this planet does not rest on leaders alone, writes DOROTHY GRACE GUERRERO more...

The Tree Line: Poems for Trees, Woods & People

Harriet Griffey, Cultural Editor

2nd June, 2017

There's a certain irony that the publication of a new anthology of poems about trees coincided with President Trump's announcement yesterday that the United States would withdraw from the Paris Agreement on climate change, writes HARRIET GRIFFEY more...
Ecuador's 'free trade' agreement with the US only undermined their ability to get justice for Texaco's toxic legacy of oil pollution, and did little to attract investment. Now it has been dumped along with 15 others. Photo of Lago Agrio by Caroline Bennet

Ecuador rips up 16 toxic trade treaties

Nick Dearden / Global Justice Now

31st May 2017

Ecuador is the latest country to tear up 'free trade' agreements that have so far cost the country $21 billion in damages awarded to foreign companies by 'corporate courts', and yielded next to nothing in return, writes Nick Dearden. So the outgoing President Correa did the only sensible thing: in one of his final executive acts this month, he scrapped 16 toxic trade and investment treaties. more...

Ecologist Special Report: Empowering women to tackle climate change

Arthur Wyns

30th May, 2017

Women are not just a ‘tool' for social and environmental justice - they are agents of real change, and have the right to be engaged in all climate negotiations. ARTHUR WYNS reports on current moves to empower women to tackle climate change more...
Uluru at sunset. Photo: Chris Ford via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

Australia's time to recognise indigenous peoples' sovereignty

Harry Hobbs, UNSW

26th May 2017

For 80 years Australia's Aboriginal peoples have called for land rights and sovereignty, writes Harry Hobbs. And for 80 years they have been ignored or brushed aside. But now delegates meeting at Uluru have issued a 'statement from the heart' demanding constitutional reform to empower Indigenous people to take 'a rightful place in our own country'. Their call must be heard! more...
Liberian Coast Guard prepares to board the Star Shrimper XXV. Photo: Alejandra Gimeno / Sea Shepherd Global.

Sea Shepherd helps arrest 'sustainable' shrimp trawler for illegal fishing in Liberian waters

Peter Hammarstedt / Sea Shepherd

26th May 2017

A 'Friend of the Sea' Dutch-owned trawler certified to supply 'sustainably caught' shrimp to the US and EU was arrested in Liberia after operating in an an area reserved for artisanal fishers, writes Peter Hammarstedt. The vessel, which had no licence and lacked the turtle excluders required by law, was discovered by the crew of Sea Shepherd's 'Bob Barker' in a joint mission with the Liberian Coast Guard to clamp down on rampant illegal fishing. more...
If you think fossil fuel lobbyists belong in UN climate negotiations, maybe you also think Santa smokes Lucky Strikes, and the tobacco industry belongs in the World Health Organisation. Photo: Phil Wolff via Flickr (CC BY-SA).

Bonn climate talks' glacial progress shows why we must kick fossil fuels out!

Pascoe Sabido / Corporate Europe Observatory

25th May 2017

The participation of the fossil fuel industry in UN climate talks represents clear a conflict of interest, writes Pascoe Sabido. And nowhere has this been more apparent than at this month's UNFCCC meeting in Bonn, where fossil fuel representatives have slowed progress to a snail's pace. With just six months to go before November's COP23 negotiations, it's time to defy the US, EU and Australia, and kick fossil fuel lobbyists out! more...
Guarani tribal leader and activist Ladio Veron speaking outside the Brazilian Embassy in London, in an action replicated across the globe. Photo: still from Survival video.

Only global protest can secure land rights and justice for Brazil's Guarani people

Lewis Evans

24th May 2017

On the one side, the Guarani people and the entire panoply of international and Brazilian law asserting the rights of indigenous peoples to their lives, lands, and way of life. Against them, the entrenched economic and political power of farmers, ranchers, loggers and others exploiting the wealth of the Guarani's soils, forests and waters. Right now the power of money is winning every time. Only with international pressure can the Guarani emerge victorious. more...
David Headley can light his spring on fire. David asked the PA Dept. of Environmental Protection to take a look. The DEP inspector told David it was probably a rotting log. The spring bubbles almost constantly, and has now for about two years since Marcel

Whitehall's fracking science failure: shale gas really is worse for climate than coal

Paul Mobbs

24th May 2017

The UK government claim that fracking is a 'clean' energy source rests on the conclusions of a single scientific paper, writes Paul Mobbs. And now that paper has been conclusively invalidated: it uses misleading figures that understate the methane emissions from fracking, and subsequent findings have left it totally discredited. Yet the paper is still being quoted to justify fracking, and the fool the public on its climate change impacts. more...

Ecologist Special Report: The battle for the ‘mother of rivers'

Nosmot Gbadamosi

22nd May, 2017

Scientists are praising the discovery of new species and rare dolphins in the Mekong region, but overfishing and dams loom to disrupt habitats writes NOSMOT GBADAMOSI in this special Ecologist report more...

Sustainable Social Housing... How an eco cabin built entirely from waste shows it can be done

Matthew Kong

18th May, 2017

Scottish recycling expert, Angus Carnie has built an eco cabin in his native Carnoustie, Dundee, using only materials that were free. Now living happily without bills, he tells MATTHEW KONG how his modest home could help inspire a new vision for social and affordable housing more...

Rewilding America - The People & The Land

William Hawes

17th May, 2017

If we are to survive long into this century and beyond, our society will have to learn to re-indigenize (or rewild) itself - both its people and its environment, writes WILLIAM HAWES more...
Huichol Indians participate in a traditional peyote ceremony in the mountains outside Real de Catorce. Photo: Kurt Hollander.

Battle in the Mexican desert: silver mining against peyote and indigenous spirituality

Kurt Hollander

30th May 2017

Silver, indigenous Huichol communities and the peyote they venerate have co-existed in Wirikuta, northern Mexico for thousands of years, writes Kurt Hollander. But it's become an increasingly troubled relationship, one that illustrates the deepest conflicts of Mexican society. The region is protected as a UNESCO Natural Sacred Area, but foreign mining companies are determined to exploit vast concessions that pose severe threats to the fragile landscape, its inhabitants and their ancient culture. more...

ECOLOGIST COOKIES

Using this website means you agree to us using simple cookies.

More information here...

 

FOLLOW
THE ECOLOGIST

 

Help us keep the Ecologist platform going

Since 2012, the Ecologist has been owned and published by a small UK-based charity called the Resurgence Trust. We work hard to support the kind of independent journalism and comment that we know Ecologist readers enjoy but we need your help to keep going. We do all this on a very small budget with a very small editorial team and so joining the Trust or making a donation will show us you value our work and support the platform which is currently offered as a free service.

Join The Resurgence TrustDonate to support the Resurgence Trust