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Spiritual Ecology: 10 Practices to Reawaken the Sacred in Everyday Life

Kara Moses

17th July, 2017

How does cleaning your kitchen help resolve the planetary crisis? Why does the manner in which you cook your dinner have implications for how you affect change in the world? Perhaps more than you think. KARA MOSES reviews Spiritual Ecology: 10 Practices to Reawaken the Sacred in Everyday Life more...

UK Artists showcase the plight of the disappearing British bee

Gary Cook, Arts Editor

7th July, 2017

Ecologist Arts Editor, GARY COOK, visits a new exhibition showcasing the plight of the British bee - those species already sadly lost and those on the verge of extinction more...

Illegal genetically modified bacteria found in animal feed supplement

Jonathan Latham, PhD and Allison Wilson, PhD

30 June, 2017

Contamination of food grade or animal feed supplements with genetically engineered bacteria is illegal in the European Union. A German enforcement laboratory alerted EU officials to illegal genetically engineered bacterial contamination of a riboflavin supplement intended for animal feed. more...

The ARTS Interview: Soundscape Artist, Matthew Shaw

Gary Cook

23rd March, 2017

Ecologist Arts Editor, GARY COOK, meets a UK-based artist/musician whose unique 'soundscapes' capture the other worldly genus loci of the natural world - its sacred sites and hidden gems more...

Rewilding Spirituality

Kara Moses

21st February, 2017


Efforts to address the planetary crisis must include a contemporary spiritual ecology to cultivate the deep humility and fierce resolve required to live sustainably and create a new story about the place of humanity in a post-capitalist world, writes KARA MOSES
more...
The Amazonian manatee, considered 'vulnerable' by the IUCN, is among the species at risk if oil drilling goes ahead. Photo: susy freitas via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

BP, Total oil drilling would endanger newly discovered Amazon coral reef

Lawrence Carter / Energydesk

23rd February 2017

A unique and pristine coral reef in the mouth of the Amazon is threatened by oil drilling planned by oil giants Total and BP, say the scientists who recently explored it. But the oil companies are determined to press ahead despite the risks, writes Lawrence Carter, and Brazil's environment ministry is set to give its approval. more...

Proposal for a ban on international trade in elephant ivory is defeated at the CITES conference

Johannesburg, South Africa

3rd October

Desperate not to offend the host country, the EU delegates at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) ignored a million-strong petition, a resolution from the European Parliament and the views of a large majority of African Range states and failed to give elephants greater protection more...

Rare dormice return to Yorkshire Dales National Park

Susan Clark

27th June, 2016

There's the Referendum vote and then there's what else happened on Brexit day. This, for instance... more...
Grizzly bear in Wyoming. Photo: Scott Taylor via Flickr (CC BY-ND).

National Park service finally stands up for Grizzlies - and for people!

Louisa Willcox

9th February 2016

As the movement to 'delist' Grizzly bears from protection under the Endangered Species Act gathers pace in US states and the Fish & Wildlife Service, two National Park superintendents have spoken out for the bears', writes Louisa Willcox. The hunters and the FWS may be furious, but the change of approach enjoys strong support from a public who have come to love their local bears. more...
This jaguar is in a zoo in French Guyana - not to be confuised with the wild jaguars of Mexico, now returning to their former range in the US. Photo: Yannick TURBE via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

From Yucatan to Arizona, from Sonora to New Mexico: the return of the jaguar

Kent Paterson

13th November 2015

Mexico is determined to restore populations of its largest native predator, the jaguar, to long term viability, writes Kent Paterson. That means creating millions of acres of ecological corridors across the country, and joining with US colleagues to secure large areas of habitat in southwestern states, where recent sightings give hope that jaguars are returning to their former range. more...
The pine marten may look cuddly - but it's no such thing, specially if you're a grey squirrel. But lighter, more agile reds fare rather better. Photo: Thomas Broxton Jr via Flickr (CC BY).

Pine martens' return could bring a red squirrel resurgence

Emma Sheehy

28th August 2015

The return of pine martens to central Ireland has been followed by a resurgence of red squirrels, writes Emma Sheehy. Now that the predatory mammal is being seen south of the Scottish border, the same could happen in England. The heavier grey squirrel is easy prey for pine martens, and their demise could open up ecological space for the native red to recolonise. more...
Surfing at Noosa Beach, Australia. To avoid shark attack, keep out of the water at dawn and dusk, and avoid turbid estuaries. Even sharks can make mistakes. Photo: m.maddo via Flickr (CC BY).

Culling sharks doesn't work - here's what we can do instead

Jane Williamson

26th August 2015

Following six shark attacks this year on the beaches of New South Wales, Australia, the press are demanding a shark cull as a 'permanent solution' to the problem, writes Jane Williamson. Trouble is, culling is indiscriminate, ineffective, disrupts ocean ecosystems, and diverts resources from more effective responses. more...

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Cecil the lion, photographed in April 2010 in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Photo: Daughter#3 via Flickr (CC BY-SA).

Africa has half as many lions as 20 years ago - but don't blame trophy hunting

Lochran Traill & Norman Owen-Smith

2nd Ausgust 2015

The killing of Zimbabwe's Cecil the Lion has put a welcome spotlight on the alarming decline of Africa's lions, write Lochran Traill & Norman Owen-Smith. But to save the species, we should not obsess about trophy hunting, but tackle much more serious problems - like snaring and habitat fragmentation. more...
A Eurasian lynx captured on film by Erwin von Maanen in its native Scandinavian setting.

Lynx could be reintroduced to Britain 'this year'

Oliver Tickell

27th April 2014

Lynx could be re-introduced to sites in England and Scotland before the end of 2015, according to the Lynx UK Trust, which has just issued polling and survey results that show strong support for the idea among the UK population. more...
A female Eurasian Lynx (Lynx Lynx Lynx) in her summer coat in a Norwegian forest near Liaset, Buskerud Fylke. Photo: Tom Bech via Flickr (CC BY).

Reintroduce lynx? Fine - but we must control the apex predator

Niki Rust

27th April 2015

The return of the lynx to the British Isles could bring many benefits, writes Niki Rust, not least to the ecology of our woodlands, ravaged by too many deer. But we must not forget the human factor: livestock farmers may fear the arrival of a top-level predator, and their support will be essential to the success of any reintroduction. more...
Wolves - to reduce farm animal predation, don't shoot them! Photo: USFWS Midwest, CC BY.

Shot in the foot? Killing wolves, lynx, cougar increases farm predation

Niki Rust

4th December 2014

Farmers who shoot wolves and other predators to save their animals from predation are actually having the opposite effect, writes Niki Rust. The disruption that killing predators has on the stability of their families and packs actually causes more, not less predation. Ultimately, we're better off learning to live with predators. more...
The possible lengthening of ice-free periods may affect polar bears before the end of the century. Photo: Brocken Inaglory via Wikimedia Commons.

With melting Arctic ice, Canada's polar bears face wipe-out by 2100

Tim Radford

6th December 2014

The expected melting of sea ice in Canada's Arctic Archipelago will progressively render huge areas unable to support viable polar bears populations, writes Tim Radford. By 2100 the polar bears could be pushed out altogether. more...
Fin whale landed at Miòsandur whaling station Hvalfjördur, Iceland, in August 2014. Photo: EIA.

EU leads diplomatic protest against Iceland's whaling

The Ecologist

16th September 2014

As the IWC meeting begins today in Slovenia, the EU, its 28 member states and the United States, Australia, Brazil, Israel, New Zealand, Mexico and Monaco, have expressed their opposition to Iceland's commercial whaling in a powerful diplomatic broadside. more...
Lanthanotus borneensis or the Earless Monitor Lizard. Photo: TRAFFIC.

Collectors' trade threatens 'Holy Grail' of the reptile world

The Ecologist

10th August 2014

An earless species of monitor lizard from Borneo has suddenly erupted into the international trade among pet keepers and reptile collectors. Although it is protected within its range, there are no restrictions on international trade in the species. An urgent CITES listing is desperately needed! more...
The Kill - two wolves chowing down on what used to be a deer. Photo: Patrick Bell via Flickr.com.

Idaho wolf eradication challenged

The Ecologist

10th January 2014

Conservation groups have mounted a legal challenge to an 'unprecedented' program to exterminate two entire wolf packs in the Idaho Wilderness - intended to inflate elk numbers and attract recreational hunters more...
Tiger. Photo:  @Doug88888 via Flickr.com.

Restore large carnivores to save struggling ecosystems

William Ripple

10th January 2014

The key to keeping ecosystems in good health is to maintain or restore populations of large carnivores, argues William Ripple. Yet around the world, these vital species are on the decline. more...
Lion from 'In Predatory Light: Lions and Tigers and Polar Bears'

In Predatory Light

Edgar Vaid

9th December 2013

Edgar Vaid reviews 'In Predatory Light: Lions and Tigers and Polar Bears', by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas, Sy Montgomery, and John Houston more...

Bluefin tuna protected - but what about the sharks?

The Ecologist

25th November 2013

ICCAT, the Atlantic tuna commission, sets science-based bluefin tuna catch quotas in the Mediterranean - but fails to protect for vulnerable sharks, or clamp down on rule breakers. more...

Koch Brothers win 2013 Rubber Dodo Award

The Ecologist

12th November 2013

The Koch Brothers, who famously fund climate change denial groups in the USA, and other right-wing causes, are the joint winners of a dubious accolade. more...
Sumatran tiger

Indonesia's Sumatran tiger threatened by development of last jungle strongholds

Dr. Julian Bloomer

4th September, 2012

As politicians encourage development around the Kerinci Seblat National Park, Dr. Julian Bloomer explores how the area's endangered species can be protected more...

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