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Bats' unique heart rate conserves energy and powers flight

Brendan Montague

13th October, 2017

A new eLife study, using state of the art heart monitoring technology, explains how bats turn their food into energy. BRENDAN MONTAGUE reports more...

Ash armageddon threatens 70 million British trees

Gary Cook

5th October, 2017

Ecologist Arts Editor, GARY COOK, discusses a new exhibition focused on the plight of British Ash - a home for over 1000 other species more...

Our obsolescent economy: modern capitalism and 'throwaway culture'

Steven Gorelick

26 September, 2017

We live in a throwaway society. Innovation in the tech industries mean ever more powerful products come to market. But the death of repair shops and a culture of reliance is not simply the result of shiny new things. Corporations, and capitalism itself, requires planned obsolesce, argues STEVEN GORELICK more...

Bovine tuberculosis testing - we really need to talk

Tom Langton

11th September, 2017

Are the shortcoming of existing cattle TB tests soon to be exposed by a simple, clever blood test that has been waiting in the wings? The development may shine light on practical compromises in the extended, failing fight against TB in England - at huge tax-payers expense. Biologist TOM LANGTON looks at a growing dilemma in the world of bovine TB cattle testing more...

Displaced in the DRC: Finding a home for the Batwa

Katie Dancey-Downs

13th September, 2017

Displaced from their ancestral land, the Batwa people of the Democratic Republic of Congo have faced years of instability. A new eco-village offers hope to the community, but fulfilling basic needs while still respecting cultural identities is a delicate balance. KATIE DANCEY-DOWNS reports more...

Should greening your money be high on your to-do list?

Becky O’Connor

18th September, 2017

Investment is one way to ensure your impact on the environment is as positive as possible - and may even change the attitudes and behaviours of the industries where green investment takes hold. All investments involve risk and you can lose your money. But some claim to have less impact on the environment, says BECKY O'CONNOR more...

Millions worldwide hit by unprecedented flooding as climate change becomes a deadly reality

Claire James

31st August, 2017

Floods in Sierra Leone. Floods in India. Floods in Nepal. Floods in Bangladesh. Officials now estimate 41 million people across India, Nepal and Bangladesh have been affected. And of course there have been floods in Houston, Texas. We knew climate change would bring more flooding, so is this what the future holds, asks CLAIRE JAMES more...

Cumbria's Bovine TB problem - hidden for years but now in the news

Lesley Docksey

25th August, 2017

Slowly the incidence of bTB in Cumbria has increased without any real outcry from the agricultural lobby. Why then, at the beginning of this month (August), has all of this information suddenly become news asks LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Dealing with climate migration: 'what matters are our actions'

Arthur Wyns

21st August, 2017

Human induced climate change will have many effects on people’s homes, livelihoods and current way of living. But what happens with the millions that will be displaced? ARTHUR WYNS takes a look at Bangladesh, a low-lying country of delta’s marshes and Sundarbans that is at the forefront of dealing with climate migration. more...

Waste not want not - an old motto for an era of mass production

Ilana Taub

18th August, 2017

A third of food produced globally is wasted - with over 2 million tonnes of fresh fruit and veg each year never reaching a shop shelf in the UK. This level of waste is staggering, especially when we consider all the energy and resources that went into producing the food in the first place. ILANA TAUB is on a mission... more...

Donald Trump ends IPCC funding and 'abandons global science leadership'

Brenda Ekwurzel

17th August, 2017

The US has ended its funding to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change despite the serious national security implications for the country, argues BRENDA EKWURZEL more...

Climate change drives Indian farmer suicides says new study

G.B.S.N.P Varma

7th August, 2017

There is no more heartbreaking indicator of human hardship than suicide says the author of a new report that shows the devastating impact of Global Warming on struggling Indian farmers, thousands of whom have taken their own lives over the last 30 years. G.B.S.N.P VARMA reports more...

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G20 summit showed international climate action really is 'Trump- proof'

Katrin Riegger

12th July, 2017

The G19 pro-climate coalition which agreed both an energy and climate action plan and important steps to help reorient private capital flows and business strategies towards a new sustainable direction has been deemed a success by many environmentalists, writes KATRIN RIEGGER (who was present at the conference for the Ecologist). But others say these agreements still do not go far enough and want to see global leaders adopting even more ambitious strategies to cut emissions and achieve the agreed goals of the Paris Agreement more...

Special Report: The growing importance of Urban Biodiversity

Christopher Swan, Ecologist

11th July, 2017

Biodiversity refers to the variety of all living things on Earth, but people often have very specific ideas of what it means. If you run an online search for images of biodiversity, you are likely to find lots of photos of tropical rainforests and coral reefs. Those ecosystems are invaluable, but biodiversity also exists in many other places writes ecologist, CHRISTOPHER SWAN more...

Foxhounds and bovine TB edges (finally) into the news

Lesley Docksey

23rd June, 2017

The publication of research into foxhounds and bovine TB is being hidden behind a cover up, with an outbreak in one hunt's pack kept secret for three months before the news leaked out, writes LESLEY DOCKSEY more...

Australian Government and UNESCO are Oceans Apart on Climate Change and the Great Barrier Reef

Maxine Newlands

12th June, 2017

Australia's governments and mining giant Adani have announced the go ahead for a mega mine - despite the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization's (UNESCO) warnings over climate change and the likely impact on the Great Barrier Reef. MAXINE NEWLANDS reports more...

Ecologist Exclusive: Theresa May's views on fox hunting lack scientific validity

Iain McGill & Colleagues

5th June, 2017

Theresa May's suggestion that she was going to allow a free vote in Parliament on repealing the Hunting Act met with howls of outrage , not least from vets concerned about animal welfare. Dr Iain McGill (who spoke at the recent Keep the Ban protest) and his colleagues write here about her ignorance on hunting and, given the Kimblewick hounds issue, the danger posed by making hunting legal again. more...

Chelsea Flower Show - using garden spaces to tackle the challenges of climate change

Laura Briggs

25th May, 2017

It seems we've been talking about bringing green areas to urban spaces for years, but at this year's Chelsea Flower Show (which runs until 27th May) it's clear this theme remains a top priority writes LAURA BRIGGS who pays a visit to the world's best known flower show more...
The Kimblewick hunt on its Boxing Day meet, 2016. Photo: Roger Marks via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND).

Foxhunting hounds and bovine TB - why the official silence?

Lesley Docksey

15th May 2017

Teresa May's promise to bring back foxhunting has proved one of the most unpopular items in the Tories' election platform. So we should not be surprised at the official silence over the TB-infected hounds in the Kimblewick hunt, writes Lesley Docksey. Nor, given the political power of foxhunting landowners, should we be surprised that officials are shrugging off any idea that bad biosecurity in hunt kennels could possibly have anything to do with TB in cattle. more...
Skyscrape of Dubai, seen from the beach. Photo: ZeNahla via Flickr (CC BY-NC).

Concrete, or beaches? World's sand running out as global construction booms

Nick Meynen

9th May 2017

A crucial component of concrete, sand is vital to the global construction industry, writes Nick Meynen. China alone is importing a billion tonnes of sand a year, and its increasing scarcity is leading to large scale illegal mining and deadly conflicts. With ever more sand fetched from riverbeds, shorelines and sandbanks, roads and bridges are being undermined and beaches eroded. And the world's sand wars are only set to worsen. more...
Another 100,000 English badgers could be shot because of fake science and faker statistics. Photo: Tom Langton. Note that no badgers died or suffered to produce this photograph!

Lies, damned lies and twisted statistics - fake science set to kill 100,000 English badgers

Tom Langton

13th April 2017

The government / NFU badger culling policy is based on a single study, the Randomised Badger Culling Trials (RBCT), which found that area-wide badger killing reduced TB 'breakdowns' in cattle herds. But a robust reanalysis of the RBCT data reveals that culling is entirely ineffective, writes Tom Langton. The only scientifically valid conclusion is that culling badgers has no effect on TB in cattle. Defra and Natural England must think again! more...
Photo: Tom Langton.

Bovine TB summit: science-based policy, or policy-based science?

Tom Langton

7th April 2017

The Bovine TB conference in London last week was disrupted by media reporting of scientific conflict over badger culling studies, writes ecologist Tom Langton. But the real story is the collapse of confidence in the Randomised Badger Culling Trials, used to justify the mass killing of badgers; and the emergence of reliable new TB tests. The simple solution: stop the cull, and spend the money on gamma interferon cattle TB testing. more...

Taking the First Step - Towards uniting and forming an activist-based Global Left

William Hawes

29th March, 2017

As UK Prime Minister triggers Article 50 and the negotiations for Britain's exit from Europe today (29th March, 2017) serious activists should take a step back, reflect on the hydra-like nature of capitalism and how their own lives have become ensnared by it, and then begin to organize for the long game, writes WILLIAM HAWES more...
Badgered to death? Photo: Andrew Gray via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA).

Badgered to Death? Now MPs have no excuse for ignorance

Dominic Dyer

20th March 2017

The badger cull is a clear failure on scientific, cost and humanity grounds, writes Dominic Dyer. Yet the government is planning a major extension of the cull in 2017. That's why he has just sent a copy of his acclaimed book to every British MP, before they debate the issue next week. Write to yours now demanding an end to the slaughter! more...
English badger at sunset near Canterbury, Kent. Let's all blame him for farmers' poor biosecurity! Photo: Ian Blacker via Flickr (CC BY-ND).

Is Natural England granting unlawful badger cull licences to farmers with poor biosecurity?

Anna Dale

29th March 2017

Below-par farm biosecurity should block farmers from participating in England's badger culls, writes Anna Dale. But a large body of evidence of poor and negligent biosecurity by farmers suggests that Natural England, the government's official regulator, is turning a blind eye to this strict requirement - and undermining the purpose of the cull. more...

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