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The decline in pollinators has previously been linked to pesticide use, habitat loss and disease

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Bees stung by 'climate change-linked' early pollination

Ecologist

7th September, 2010

Climate change may be causing flowers to open before bees emerge from hibernation leading to declines in pollination, new research suggests

Climate change could be affecting pollination by disrupting the synchronised timing of flower opening and bee emergence from hibernation, suggests new US-based research.

Declining numbers of bees and other pollinators have been causing growing concern in recent years, as scientists fear that decreased pollination could have major impacts on world food supplies.

Previous studies have focused on pollinators and have linked falling populations to the use of pesticides, habitat loss and disease.

However, a 17-year analysis of the wild lily in Colorado by scientists from the University of Toronto, suggests other factors may be at play. The study revealed a long-term decline in pollination, which was particularly pronounced earlier in the season.

Study author James Thomson said while bee numbers had declined at their research site he suspected that a ‘climate-driven mismatch between the times when flowers open and when bees emerge from hibernation is a more important factor’.

‘Early in the year, when bumble bee queens are still hibernating, the fruiting rates are especially low,’ he said.  ‘This is sobering because it suggests that pollination is vulnerable even in a relatively pristine environment that is free of pesticides and human disturbance but still subject to climate change.’ 


Despite the findings, other experts remained cautious about the influence of climate change on bee pollination. 

Francis Ratnieks, professor of apiculture at the University of Sussex, said the downward trend of pollination observed in the study was not strong enough to extrapolate to any wider issues.

‘Who knows the degree to which [this] affects the long term viability of the population?’ he said. The study also only looked at one plant species, he added.

The Bumblebee Conservation Trust said the most significant factors driving the decline in pollinators were still unclear.

‘It is probably a combination of climate change, habitat loss, pesticide use and disease. Unless we act swiftly, these declines threaten both human wellbeing and the survival of natural ecosystems as we know them,’ said director Dave Goulson.

Study author Thomson admitted the evidence from the study was still weak but said the results were a warning that the phenomenon ‘might be widespread and needs more attention’.

‘It certainly suggests that people who have warned about the possible climate-change consequence of dislocated timing between interacting species have made a reasonable argument,’ he added. 

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