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This Lion cub will never hunt in the wild. He has been bred to be shot for 'fun'.

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Lions bred to be shot in South Africa's 'canned hunting' industry

Patrick Barkham

This video explores the shocking and lucrative industry of canned hunting, which astonishingly remains legal.....

There are now more captive lions in South Africa than wild ones, and many of these animals are reared specifically to be shot and owned by wealthy tourists from Europe and North America. Patrick Barkham visits a lion-breeding farm in North Eastern Free State, South Africa, to investigate the relationship between the rearing of lions in captivity and the so-called 'canned hunting' industry.

• Warning: Contains graphic footage

The Ecologist is a member of the Guardian's Environment Network article swap.

Image courtesy of www.shutterstock.com 


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