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If you're saying 'it' with flowers this UK Bank Holiday weekend make sure they're locally grown

Laura Briggs

26th August, 2016

A gap in the market and the digital age has seen the British organic cut flower industry flourish over the last couple of years - with chemical-free, low air-mile blooms finally seeing their day in the sun. LAURA BRIGGS reports on the homegrown market that offers a bigger variety of flowers and without the environmental costs of imported ones more...

The hydrogen economy is much nearer than we think

David Thorpe

26th August 2016

Hydrogen produced from renewable energy is already finding a market as a 'green' fuel for cars. But its future potential goes way beyond that, as a vital storage mechanism for surplus wind / solar electricity on the grid, to provide power on demand. Photo Hydrogen made from renewable electricity is already fuelling vehicles at affordable prices, writes DAVID THORPE. But now the 'green' fuel is set to go from niche to mainstream - powering not just cars, trucks and buses, but storing surplus renewable energy on sunny and windy days, then to be burnt in gas turbines or fuel cells to supply the grid with reliable power on demand. more...

Dark days ahead for British agriculture? Or green shoots of a brighter future?

Keith Tyrell / PAN UK

25th August 2016

Suffolk farmland at dusk. Photo: Jimmy - S via Flickr (CC BY-NC). With Brexit the UK will have to chose between two visions of our farming future, writes Keith Tyrell. Will it be heavily subsidised corporate agribusiness that ravages both nature and small, high quality farmers. Or will we seize the chance to build a sustainable food and farming system that supports wildlife, landscape, family farms, organic production and diverse rural economies? more...

The GMO food venture is built on a foundation of mass deception

Steven M. Druker

23rd August 2016

The first ingestible GE product, L-typtophan, derived from GMO bacteria.contained impurities that killed dozens of Americans and seriously sickened thousands, permanently disabling many of them. Image: Bin im Garten via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA). The very first GE product, a dietary supplement, poisoned thousands of people of which dozens died, writes Steven M. Druker. The first GE food, the 'Flavr Savr' tomato, caused stomach lesions. But a long campaign of concealment and deception by regulators and corporate scientists re-engineered the truth to present GMOs as so safe they did not even need to be tested for safety. more...

Degrowth and the Global Movement for Environmental Justice

ANTONIO CERRILLO trans. by NICK MEYNEN

22nd August, 2016

With the 5th International Degrowth Conference taking place next week Spanish Ecologists Professor Joan Martinez Alier and Federico Demaria - both working at the Environmental Science and Technology Institute (ICTA) at the Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB) - explain why we need a 'less is more' alternative economic model and how the burgeoning Global Environmental Justice movement is a key concept in achieving the only goal that will halt Climate Change. more...

Rooted in the soil: the birth of agro-resistance in Palestine

Jonathan Cook

19th August 2016

Olive harvest at Surif in the West Bank, Palestine. Photo: Palestine Solidarity Project via Flickr (CC BY-SA). For decades Israel has been driving Palestinian farmers off their land by imposing restrictions on agriculture, writes JONATHAN COOK. But one company, Canaan Fair Trade, has found an innovative way to resist peacefully, increasing resilience and prosperity in rural West Bank communities, and forging international alliances in the global movement for good food and farming. more...

Greenland Inuit oppose open-pit uranium mine on Arctic mountain-top

Bill Williams

17th August 2018

View south from the mine site to Narsaq below. Photo: Bill Williams. A collapse in the price of uranium has not yet stopped Australian mining company GME from trying to press ahead with a massive open-pit uranium mine on an Arctic mountain in southern Greenland, writes Bill Williams - just returned from the small coastal town of Narsaq where local people and Inuit campaigners are driving the growing resistance to the ruinous project. more...

Global climate is spinning out of control - but now, we have the technology!

Paul Rogers

16th August 2016

A new 3MW Siemens offshore wind turbine undergoing installation. Image: artist's impression by Siemens. As global temperatures reach new monthly highs and the Middle East is hit by record heatwaves, we might be forgiven for sliding into hopelessness, writes PAUL ROGERS. But a host of innovations in energy technology means that a carbon-free energy future is not just possible, but affordable. The first of the three paradigm shifts required to transform the climate change outlook is in place. more...

On Independence Day, India's new rulers are the World Bank, IMF, WTO and Monsanto

Colin Todhunter

15th August 2016

The yoke of direct colonial rule in India has been replaced with a new system of oppression and exploitation - this time by and for agribusiness corporations and transnational capital. Photo: Kannan Muthuraman via Flickr (CC BY-NC-ND). India celebrates its Independence Day today, writes Colin Todhunter. But the highly visible system of British colonial dominance has been replaced by a new imperial hegemony: the invisible, systemic rule of transnational capital, enforced by global institutions like the World Bank, while US-based global agribusiness corporations have stepped into the boots of the former East India Company. more...

Japan's big 'nuclear restart' overtaken by conservation and renewables

Jim Green

12th August 2016

The three-unit Ikata nuclear power plant in the south of Japan.Its 890MW unit 3 is the only reactor in Japan that has a chance of restarting in 2016. Photo: ja:User:Newsliner via Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA). For all Japan's talk of 43 'operable' nuclear reactors, only two are actually running, writes Jim Green, as renewables and a 12% fall in demand eat into the power market. And while Japan's 'nuclear village' defends safety standards, the IAEA, tasked with promoting nuclear power worldwide, has expressed deep concerns over the country's weak and 'fragmented' safety regulation. more...

Rampal coal plant: Indian coal dream fast becoming a nightmare for Bangladesh

Greig Aitken, BankTrack

11th August, 2016

It is becoming ever more apparent that if the proposed new Rampal coal plant is a ‘dream project' for India, then as currently conceived it stands to become a nightmare for Bangladesh warns GREIG AITKEN more...

Why we need to keep rivers cool with riverside tree planting

Ecologist reporter

10th August, 2016

With some climate predictions warning that river water temperatures will exceed safe thresholds for river fish, the Keep Rivers Cool (KRC) campaign is calling for more riverside tree planting. more...

Hinkley Point, Greg Clark and the fate of Britain's energy future

JONATHON PORRITT

9th August, 2016

Hinkley C - it now looks as if the UK may not be saddled with this monstrous white elephant after all. Image: EDF. The government's surprise delay in signing the contract with EDF to build the Hinkley C nuclear power station has opened up a the space for a forward-looking UK energy policy, writes Jonathon Porritt - one that moves us into the world of low cost renewables, and smart new technologies vital to the global clean energy transition. But is Business & Energy Greg Clark for real? Don't rule it out! more...

Soil Association campaigns against glyphosate in our bread

Laura Briggs

8th August, 2016

The Soil Association is calling on bread producers and supermarkets to stop making and selling bread products that contain traces of Glyphosate. LAURA BRIGGS reports. more...

Uranium from Russia, with love

Nick Meynen

4th August, 2016

Uranium mining is a dirty business that we didn't clean up but sourced out to less demanding countries, so why isn't this being discussed in any debate about nuclear energy asks NICK MEYNEN more...

Ecologist Investigation: How the largest inland fisheries in the world are being destroyed

TOM FAWTHROP

3rd August, 2016

Every morning Lao and Cambodian fishermen land their catch to sell at Veung Kham market just inside the Lao Border. ​Photo: Tom Fisherman. Investigative reporter, TOM FAWTHROP has just returned from the site of the Don Sahong - a hydrodam being constructed in the middle of an eco-paradise of wetlands in Southern Laos where over 200 fish species have been recorded. more...

US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's 'enforcement' is as fierce as the comfy chair

Linda Pentz Gunter

2nd August 2016

The transformer fire at Vermont Yankee nuclear power station, 18th June 2004. Photo: anonymous whistleblower via nukeworker.com. The NRC routinely fails to enforce its own safety codes at nuclear power plants, writes Linda Pentz Gunter - putting all of us at risk from accidents. It's the US's most extreme example of regulatory capture, rivalling Japan's 'nuclear village' of crony agencies and feeble regulation that led to the Fukushima disaster. How long can it be before the US experiences another nuclear catastrophe? more...

Why we need to better protect Britain's ancient woodlands

Laura Briggs

1st August 2016

Calls for better protection of the UK's ancient woodlands are being made by environmental groups due to a loophole in the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF), last revised in 2012. LAURA BRIGGS reports more...

Australian Climate Sceptics Challenge Clean Energy Plan

Maxine Newlands

28th July, 2016

Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull has handed the environment portfolio to the energy minister in an attempt to calm climate sceptics. But will it work? Ecologist writer Maxine Newlands reports. more...

TTIP: The most dangerous weapon in the hands of the fossil fuel industry

Andreas Sieber & Pavlos Georgiadis

27th July, 2016

The European Union and the USA have been negotiating the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) behind closed doors since 2013. Negotiators kept insisting that their secret talks would work in the best interest of the public and the environment. But since Greenpeace leaked the TTIP draft negotiating documents it became clearer than ever, that this trade agreement could become one of the most dangerous weapons in the hands of the fossil fuel industry in its effort to kill Climate Action for the 21st century. The elephant in the room is here and it is huge: the word "climate" means something totally different in the TTIP papers. more...

What Theresa May forgot: North Korea used British technology to build its nuclear bombs

David Lowry

26th July 2016

North Korean nuclear reactor construction under way on 24th April 2008. Photo: Wapster / Google Maps via Flickr (CC BY). When Theresa May proclaims in Parliament that we need the £200 billion Trident nuclear missile system to see off the North Korean nuclear threat, writes David Lowry, just bear this in mind. It is a threat that the UK, global nuclear proliferator in chief, created in the first place, providing both the reactor technology and vital centrifuge materials to make North Korea's nuclear dream come true. more...

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